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Do the cravings ever go away?

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Been smoke free for 5 weeks and the cravings are still driving me crazy... I gave in today. I had 2 cigs and they tasted horrible but they did soothe the goddamn itch that I’ve been struggling with for weeks. This is the first time I’ve smoked since my quit date. I’m so tired of distracting myself and I’m all out of willpower. I don’t want to relapse although that would be so easy at this point. Are these cravings ever going to go away? And when do I get my energy back? All I want to do is sleep lately..... I’m getting fat and no one even cares about or supports me quitting. Feels like I’ve taken my only coping strategy away from myself and now I’m just depressed and socially anxious. 

Edited by del
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Del - you're in a terrible spot. 2 cigs is a relapse. The cravings will eventually become something that don't seem so overwhelming, but only if you don't never have another puff.

 

Take a breath, remember the things that helped you decide to quit. If you don't smoke then smoking can't hurt your health any further. Smoking can't rob you have energy if you don't do it. Sleeping is good for your body, and you can deal with weight as you get further away from your quit date.

 

I don't remember any magic formula that made any of the crappy part of quitting go away. It sucks, and the only thing that actually makes it go away is time. 

 

You've made a great decision to quit, it's ok to want to snap, freak out, and stamp your feet, but if you take a puff it all starts again.

 

This can be a great place to get support when everyone around you seems not to care. 

 

Take a breath del and be at peace as best you can.

 

R

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Hi and welcome Del...

You had a good quit going ...

You have a train full of quitters here ,who will tell you YES...it does get easier...and the only way this happens is if .....

You Never Stick Anything In Your Mouth And Set Fire To It ....

This is the place to be for Support...we all understand and have been where you are ...my advice...Dust Down ...

Read all you can here...stay around ...post often ...Learn about this awful Addiction....

We have all Quit ...you are no different ,you can and will if you want it bad enough...

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Welcome del, I know how you feel. The first few months are the hardest but they are doable. I too had absolutely no energy. I found that sucking on candy really helped both the craves and the foggy head feeling. I also let my body dictate what it needed in order to try to repair all the damage done by smoking. So if it was hungry, I ate. Tired, I slept, etc.

Also when you get a bad crave you can come on here and post an SOS letting us know you need some extra support. We will come running to help you past it. I did a couple times and they worked :)

The last tool I used for a good six months was my air cigarette. I just pretended I was holding an actual cigarette then went through the motions of "smoking" it. It worked great at tricking my mind into thinking it was getting the real thing.

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Welcome to the train Del :) 

 

You've had some great advice already. You now have to decide if you want to get this done or not because, it WILL take an unwavering commitment and follow through to be successful.

 

Those annoying craves will go away but you need to stick with your commitment not to smoke to make that happen. Knowledge about this addiction and how it works is another key component. Everything to do with that knowledge is available for you here. Read all you can here on the site and watch the Joel videos. All are informative. Knowing how this addiction works will improve your chances of success because you can then outsmart it rather than trying to just fight it. And support from others who are on the same journey as you are is surprisingly helpful. You'll get support here not just for a week or two but for your entire time here on the train. Support and a sharing of helpful information - you can't beat that :) 

 

So now it's down to you - what will you choose? Continued addiction or a better life smoke free? Get rid of any cigs you have & let's get this done!

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Welcome aboard Del, good to have you along for the journey.  The craves stick around for a bit but after time it does get much better, the first month can be pretty hard then slowly you learn to fight the craves.  Read here and educate yourself, you will see that we hall have gone thru this.  Also come along and post and learn from everyone's experience -- it will help greatly and doing the NOPE pledge each day -- it really did help me.

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7 hours ago, del said:

I gave in today. I had 2 cigs

7 hours ago, del said:

 I don’t want to relapse

 

del,

You HAVE relapsed. 

Time to face the truth, re-set your ticker and be honest with yourself.

Do you want to quit or do you want to smoke ?

Until you commit to yourself and your quit you will fail and continue to torture yourself.

 

Please educate yourself about your addiction

and commit to Not One Puff Ever.

We are all here to support you but, you must do the work.

It may not be easy but, it is ultimately DOABLE and the discomforts are Temporary.

Embrace the suck and reap the many, many rewards.

 

This post might help you

10 Ways To Effectively Use This Forum To Quit Smoking

If you follow those 10 suggestions in your own way, you will build a successful quit.

 

Please, take your life seriously and commit to your quit, your LIFE.

 

Do the cravings go away ?  Yes, they do but, it takes time.

The truth is, it takes about a year to sort things out.

You are re-booting your brain !

Your craves will continue to fade after weeks/months, 

you will have faced seasonal triggers

and your self-esteem and confidence will flower.

Edited by Sazerac
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del,

Craves NEVER go away if you smoke, you live in a perpetual circle of craves.

Every twenty minutes or so, nicotine levels plummet and create a crave.

 

 

.cycle18k.gif.a654c7c845e4902e330e16055d71ea47.gif

 

 

 

When you quit, you free yourself from nicotine's  tyranny.

Edited by Sazerac
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2 hours ago, Sazerac said:

del,

You HAVE relapsed. 

Sazerac is right

 

 

I have blown quits with 1 or two ciggs. But a relapse, you have. Just Get back on, drink lots of water and flush the nic out

 

 

Every loss is a lesson

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8 hours ago, del said:

 I’m so tired of distracting myself and I’m all out of willpower.

 

Willpower is not a foundation to build a lasting lifetime change upon.  Willpower waxes and wanes...comes and goes.

 

Commitment and education is where rock-solid quits are built.  Quits built on commitment and education are quits that are built to last.

 

8 hours ago, del said:

 I’m getting fat and no one even cares about or supports me quitting.

 

The process of quitting is a deeply personal one.  You will have to ask yourself some serious questions.  You will learn things about yourself during the process.

 

In spite of those around us, we ultimately make our most important decisions alone.

 

That being said...if you want support, you can always find it here on the Train.  I just finished reading through the responses to your original post and you received great advice from people who have successfully quit and know what they are talking about.

 

8 hours ago, del said:

 Are these cravings ever going to go away? 

 

Yes.  Absolutely.  I can still remember the cravings and thoughts of those early days of my quit.  However, I can't even remember the last time I actually craved a cigarette.  Cravings for nicotine are not an issue for me any longer, they are nonexistent at this point.

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I found that the people around me were largely disinterested in my quit.  Even my doctor (who had been telling me to quit) barely acknowledged it.

 

Don’t expect daily applause from casual friends and coworkers, especially as time goes by.  Find a family member or someone who has quit or is also trying to quit, they would provide that positive feedback for you.  This forum is full of successful quitters who will tell you how awesome you (and us) are for quitting and maintaining the quit, but you will still have to do the hard work yourself, no one can do it for you.

 

I mean, sure, non-smokers had encouraging words when I told them I was quitting, but they never circled back to ask how it was going.   Non smokers think quitting is as easy as it would be to stop toasting your bagel in the morning.  They have no idea the physiological and emotional roller coaster you’re on

 

Current smokers had encouraging words up front, but will tend to avoid you after, neither encouraging or discouraging.  I think it’s because they’re  envious that you a) had the courage to quit and b) of your continued success.  I’m ashamed to say that I was this was how I felt as a smoker when one of my smoking buddies quit.  I felt validated when they relapsed and started smoking again.

 

And sadly, some smokers will try to lure you back, because misery loves company.  Best avoid those people entirely.

Edited by Wayne045
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 Mental Balloons

Posted by gonfishn21 on 16 January 2015 - 06:17 PM

As I'm now chasing the tweenie label, and have been thinking a lot about the concerns I have had regading No Man's Land, its got me thinking again.
As most of you know, that means I'm going to ramble.

Although I am not one that needs a lot of kudos, it seems that it is a necessary part of this process for a while.
We make it through day 1 HURRAH!!!!!!!!!!
We make it through hell week HURRAY!!!!
Heck week over, " I feel better" HURRAy!!
Two weeks, wow, learning to get through the craves, HURRay!
Three weeks, can be around my friends and family without committing a felony, HURray
Four weeks, nerves under control, waistband a little tight, not bad, HUrray
Five weeks, walking, eating right, digestion shut down, but not smoking, Hurray
Six weeks, no craves, no moods, no smoking, digestion shut down, HUH?
Seven to eight weeks, no one wants to know but you, how you are doing. By the way, my digestion is shut down!
They really stopped wanting to hear weeks ago, you just kept talking about it. You can see it in their eyes when you walk up. They probably have a pool about how long it will take you to bring it up. Or even worse, the day your digestion works!
Yeah, wow woot woot yippee, big deal.
Hello No Man's Land'
How am i going to keep going with this?
I need to bring my own ballons to the party. I know my friends and family care, but they dont get it.
Even as firm as I have been since day one, this is one of the hardest things I have ever done. I know it, thats all that matters.
As i reach the little milestones ahead, I need to be the one who says HURRAY!!!!!.
I need to be the one who acknowledges the accomplishments. Afterall, in the end, I made the decision to quit, I made it through hell week, heck week, and i am the one who may never digest food again.
I need to remind myself everyday, how much I have accomplished, BEFORE I have a chance to get weak. In that way, I can stay ahead, be ready to face any challenge with a strong defense.
Smoking is no longer an option for me. Smoking is just something I used to do. I control my actions, and smoking is a choice. I choose not to smoke, even if I never digest food again.
I found a website the other day, that actually teaches you HOW TO SMOKE. I couldn't believe it. It takes you through lighting it, drawing on it, how it feels.......Holy Crap I was feeling it!!!!! Two flipping months into this, and I was feeling it, and then I knew. I had to make mental ballons and carry them with me at all times.
Everyday is a celebration, everyday needs reminders, and everyday has its challenges. There is no one here, that can not do it. I'm not special. I'm just going to carry my own balloons.
Just sayin,

Gon

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You know Del, it's mighty brave of you to own up and mention you relapsed. It's pricking you inside somewhere and you want to get back on your quit, that's why you posted.

 

you've got the accountability part down to a tee, now for the execution part. Everyone of the stalwarts before me have given you amazing advice, and i'll only probably be repeating what they've said, but repetition helps commit things to memory so here goes...

 

A crave lasts 3-4 minutes, all you have to do is distract your mind for those 3-4 minutes by watching stuff, reading, getting up and making yourself a cup of joe, or tea or whatever you like. If you're at work then getting up, taking a small walk, talking to a co-worker...just force your brain to think about something else, and that crave will go.

It is highly possible another one will come up, but gradually you'll see these craves reducing in number...it may not look like it now, but it certainly does get easier.

 

I wish you the best of luck, please stay close to the forum, we love hearing success stories :D

 

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On 2/17/2019 at 1:20 PM, del said:

 I had 2 cigs and they tasted horrible but they did soothe the goddamn itch that I’ve been struggling with for weeks. 

They didnt sooth your itch. These two cigarettes prolonged your itch. It really doesnt get any simpler than that! 

 

I whish you determination with your decision, there's absolutely no reason why you wouldn't be able to make it. Instead of idontknowhowmanytoxiccomponents, suck in all the information you can get, pick what works for you, vent, spoil yourself, scream, exercise, do yoga, stand on your head, take on a new hobby, talk to your support system about what you need. 

 

Please let us know how you are doing, it will help us  in offering you much needed support. :)

 

 

 

 

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Hi Del, glad you're here because this is where you do really get the support that...i agree with you...is often lacking from friends and family who don't always understand. My son hated me smoking yet after I quit he barely mentioned it!  At the end of the day you do it for yourself, reading the celebrations here after each month of quitting were an enormous personal boost and learning about addiction was the biggest help of all. All the physical symptoms will ease off soon and you can worry about the extra bit of weight in a little while. Hope you get back on track with the quit and hope you stick around here :)

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Don't be a DumbAss. If they never went away ... why would we quit?

Of course they go away. 

Sarge hasn't craved a cigarette in over 7 years. 

... but you can't get there if you keep doin' stupid sh*t, like smokin' ... right? 

EZPZ

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I am still wondering how someone can go several weeks and not be able to find the strength to not light up. Sure there are tough times but does someone really think, "Just a couple won't hurt".

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On 2/17/2019 at 6:20 AM, del said:

Been smoke free for 5 weeks and the cravings are still driving me crazy... I gave in today. I had 2 cigs and they tasted horrible but they did soothe the goddamn itch that I’ve been struggling with for weeks. This is the first time I’ve smoked since my quit date. I’m so tired of distracting myself and I’m all out of willpower. I don’t want to relapse although that would be so easy at this point. Are these cravings ever going to go away? And when do I get my energy back? All I want to do is sleep lately..... I’m getting fat and no one even cares about or supports me quitting. Feels like I’ve taken my only coping strategy away from myself and now I’m just depressed and socially anxious. 

 

As you can see, @del,

we are all really passionate about quitting smoking

and here for education, support and for some fun along the way.

 

You will find many voices, some may be useful to you, some may not.

Please take what you need and leave the rest.

 

The threads that weave between all of our quits is

education about nicotine addiction

and

a commitment to quit.

 

We are Nicotine Addicts.

We put the addiction to sleep.

You can also !

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So it's like this. You either smoke or you don't smoke.

 

If you've committed to not smoking, you won't smoke. That's it. You'll deal with the cravings, the lack of energy, the mood swings and the frustration and everything else that goes along with it.

 

Sorry, but if you were committed, you wouldn't have smoked those two cigarettes. You need to get your sh*t together, get your head on straight and decide if you're going to smoke or not.

 

You are no more addicted to smoking than anyone else and it's no harder for you than it was for any of us. I struggled for 9 months. It sucked and sometimes I hated it, but I committed to not smoking, so I never did (and never will again).

Who cares if no one is supporting you? You're not quitting for them. You're quitting for YOU! So what if you get fat. You'll lose the weight. This isn't a time for vanity.

 

You need to make a decision and stick with it. Either you smoke or you don't smoke. End of story.

Edited by JimHannoonen
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And to answer your question. No, the cravings will never go away if you smoke two cigarettes every 5 weeks.

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On 2/17/2019 at 4:20 AM, del said:

Been smoke free for 5 weeks and the cravings are still driving me crazy... I gave in today. I had 2 cigs and they tasted horrible but they did soothe the goddamn itch that I’ve been struggling with for weeks. This is the first time I’ve smoked since my quit date. I’m so tired of distracting myself and I’m all out of willpower. I don’t want to relapse although that would be so easy at this point. Are these cravings ever going to go away? And when do I get my energy back? All I want to do is sleep lately..... I’m getting fat and no one even cares about or supports me quitting. Feels like I’ve taken my only coping strategy away from myself and now I’m just depressed and socially anxious. 

 

Hello Del,

 

How much time have you spent learning about nicotine addiction and the process of quitting smoking ???

 

Quitting smoking is not about willpower.

 

Doing it the right way, requires education about what you are doing.

 

What you can expect, and how to deal with it. Many millions of people have quit before you. Any discomfort you have experienced, many others have experienced the same thing. Do not think your experiences are unique.

 

Invest some time in yourself, your quit and your future, and start reading and watching videos about quitting smoking. You can start right here in QuitTrain, here:

 

https://www.quittrain.com/forum/15-joel-spitzers-quit-smoking-video-library/

 

 

Cristóbal

 

Edited by Cristóbal
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