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  1. Hello, I managed to stay smoke-free for almost two days, but unfortunately smoked 3 ciggarettes today, as the brain fog became unbearable at work :(. I threw my pack, lighter and ashtray, and I am ready to jump on the Quit Train! My story: Smoked since I was 14, now I'm 23, and decided I should end this addiction for good. I'm happy to find this community and I am confident that I will manage to stay quit with the help and support provided by this forum, and hope that when the time comes I can help others quit as well. I will no longer smoke and punish myself everyday with this addiction!
    16 points
  2. When I quit smoking on Sept 7, I printed a Sept calendar sheet so I could put a red X on something each day I didn't smoke. Today marks 23 days and is the last day of the month. Felt great to have to print out a new sheet for October. Not a month of not smoking yet, but just the action of having to change the calendar felt so good. And taped at the bottom of my calendar is a small sheet that says: "If you quit now... You'll end up right back where you first began. And when you first began, you were desperate to be right where you are now. Keep going." Those red X's remind me of all I would be giving up if I take even one puff.
    15 points
  3. Why not take a seat and join us .... You,ll be surprised how better it is ,with friends who understand your fears and concerns ... Quitting can be fun ... What you waiting for
    15 points
  4. Woohoo, six years quit today!!! I couldn't have done it without all the support I received, especially my first year quit. I've been fortunate to be able to be here to pay it forward and have made great friendships with people all over the world and for that I feel so grateful
    14 points
  5. Day 13 here, day 2 with no nicotine gum. It took me a while, but I finally made it. There's really no withdrawl to speak of, just substituting regular gum and it works just fine. I'm really glad I quit this way, it worked well for me now the rest without nicotine at all is up to me. Luckily, I forgot to bring the nicotine gum to work with me a couple of times and I didn't smoke so I have no fear of relapsing at work anymore. This quit will be as long or short as I make it, glad to be back in the drivers seat. Thank you all for your support.
    14 points
  6. It certainly has been a long and winding road for me on this quitting journey. I am definitely in a much better place now...both physically and mentally. I still remember those early days of my quit and how I thought "Will I ever get to a place where I am not constantly fighting the craves?". It was so exhausting but I kept trudging forward, ever so slowly! I am still here to let you know you eventually will get to that place and it will be a source of immense pride!! I truly think I couldn't have done it without the online support of a site like QuitTrain or QSMB (my first support group which is no longer around). Thanks for acknowledging my 5 yr (!!!!!!!) milestone, Rozuki the Rockstar
    14 points
  7. A new month ... It's time to see who's still sitting on the Train .... Of course the Crazy Frog Woman is still Here ....
    14 points
  8. Ohhhh boy do I have a story to tell. Some of you know me and some of you don’t. However, I can’t expect you to remember me. It’s been an incredibly long and arduous journey. But it’s been my journey and it’s been a decent one so far. I’ve gone by many names in the past; some born from shame, some merely from forgetting my login information. Probably the most prominent username I’d been known by was HonorAmongstThieves; although many of you endearingly referred to me as HAT. Well, I could not pinpoint any username on this website, so I had to make a new one some time ago, which, as per usual it had remained dormant due to being a smoker. You see, my quit smoking journey unintentionally began on 1 January 2011. It was New Years and I only hd a couple cigarettes left but I didn’t want to go out so late to buy more. I decided to see if I could quit. And I did for about 4 months. I relapsed; which I would soon learn would be a recurring theme in my life. On the first night of my quit I came across a now defunct website, the QSMB, which is where I met many of you trying to accomplish the same thing that I was. I didn’t make an account until I was 72 hours free of nicotine in case I couldn’t hack it. I learned many techniques and coping skills that did help me through my initial 4 month quit. But alas, I was weaker than the cigarette and I fell back into my old ways. This is much how the past decade had gone for me. When I got wind of wanting to quit again, I’d lurk around, quit, be active for awhile, and then eventually relapse again. I met so many wonderful people through that website. I was even around during the great migration to this website, though I relapsed and when I came back, that website, to my surprise, was completely gone. But that’s alright because change is good. I began doing the same things here, lurking, quitting and being active here, and then relapsing. So many amazing and wonderful things have happened in my life over the past 11 years that I have tried to quit. I have worked incredibly hard to make changes in my life and I’m proud to say that I am not the same immature young adult that I was 11 years ago. Even then, I still kept smoking. Quitting. Relapsing. It’s a vicious cycle. Through all the personal struggle, the drama on the QSMB, the difficult and often painful pangs of growing and maturing, it’s all been worth it. But like Frankie said, “Regrets, I’ve had a few, but then again, to few to mention.” Still, if there was one thing I could change about my life, I would never pick up those first cigarettes. They took too much of my life, my health, my money, my looks; too much of everything. I always wondered if I would ever be back to this place, other than lurking. Even now, I still do. It’s been hard. So many countless, blurry nights where I told myself that I hated myself. That I would never change. That I told myself I didn’t have what it takes to be a better person. Even those days aren’t that long ago. But I made gradual, sometimes baby-step, changes in my life and I’m a better man now. A better husband, father, provider. I often look back to that fateful night, 11 years ago and cringe with regret. If hadn’t relapsed, I’d be preparing to celebrate 11 years of freedom from nicotine. It was exactly that thinking that kept me bogged down, unable to advance. It seemed so far away. So impossibly out of reach. I’ve honestly had to fight myself from coming back to this board and posting, and being active. Not because it’s bad, lol that is NOT the case. I learned so much about quitting smoking from the people here…but I also learned about myself. I didn’t come back because I wanted to do it on my own. With my support group at home; my wife and children; my family and friends. My mentors and peers who believed in me. But I did tell myself I would be back. I told promised myself that I would not forget the people who helped me get to this point in my life, which certainly consists of many of you who tried to educate me. For those who believed in me and never gave up on me. I came back for you. Because I believe that I owed it to you to let you know how things have been. How much my struggle with nicotine impacted my life and my decisions to this point. But most importantly, I believe I owe it to you to tell you that, as I submit this post, for the first time in my life since I began smoking, I can openly and honestly say, unequivocally, that I am happy to be here to celebrate with you that I am officially one year free from nicotine! I have waited more than a year to share this post. It is literally 11 years in the making. I don’t expect to be a full time poster here, but I will try to check in from time to time. Just know that I am finally free from this beast. It’s an amazing feeling and I cannot imagine going back to it. I know it happens. I know that people who are many years quit sometimes relapse. Just know that I am doing well, I am happy, and I am nicotine free. What a time to be alive. Thank you for never giving up on me after my many relapses and thank you all for teaching me how to kick this habit. For any new quitters, it gets better. Take it one day at a time, or one minute at a time if need be. It’s invigorating to finally be on this side of the quit. For anyone lurking, what are you waiting for? The water is perfect, come on in. As Sarge always used to say, “eazy peazy.” Very Respectfully, Your old pal HAT
    14 points
  9. So I finally pulled the trigger on replacing a storm door that's needed replaced for about 6 months. It's one of those tedious, sometimes aggravating projects, w/ lots of steps that I really didn't want to do but it had to be done. From tearing off the old one to installing, then cleaning up the mess took about 6hrs. I was having huge cravings multiple times. This is the kind of project a cigarette would have given me a reason to take a break from the job. In the past, multiple times I would have come up w/ a reason to leave in my car (need a fresh fountain drink, probably need a tube of caulk, etc) so I could go have a cigarette and give myself a break. Instead, I just worked on it for 6hrs straight, forgetting to even eat lunch, just because I wanted it over with. So many times I thought how much I wanted to leave and go smoke. So many times I thought how when the project was done, I could tell my wife I was going to go hike, but buy a pack on the way. Nobody would know. And darn straight I would have enjoyed every last puff. But I made it through. I wanted to smoke about 6. But I did not want the 7000 that would come with the 6. And I didn't want to spend $4000 for those 6. I know full well I would lose all my mojo if I have even 1 and it always takes me well over a year before I can bring myself to start a serious quit. Should have taken a break and gotten on here cause it was getting real. But, it's good to get some experience learning how to deal w/ an aggravating situation w/o nicotene. OK, that's my whine.
    14 points
  10. This Wonderful Train has been going at full speed for 8 years today .... It would be impossible to count how many smokers have been on board and found Freedom ... Thank you a million times MQ....for designing and building this place .. I know ,without you and the folks here ,I wouldn't be free today ... 3 Cheers for the Engine Driver !!!!
    13 points
  11. I had my blood test and it came back normal. It's great news and really nails home the quitting smoking theme. For those just tuning in, I had a high white cell count and the doctor said to cut down on smoking and take another blood test in three months. So now I have proof that smoking was to blame for my abnormal blood test and as long as I don't smoke anymore I will probably not have to get a bone marrow biopsy. I am so fortunate that this was found in it's infancy stage when quitting smoking now can make all the difference.
    13 points
  12. I am 73 and began smoking right out of highschool. Never had a solid quit. It would be a week here or a few days quit and then re do the process over and over. When I decided to quit, this time for good, I had read and re read Alan Carr's Easy Way over and over until I finally got it. Smoking is doing nothing for me. It is killing me slowly. Being here these past few days has helped me stay the course. In a few days I will have a week into this forever quit. Being here has helped tremendously.
    13 points
  13. It was five years ago today that I snubbed out my last smoke. I remember it like it was yesterday, now that I really think about it (which I rarely do anymore). I was standing in my usual smoking spot on the side of the house. I looked at my last smoke and said "I'm done". At that exact moment, I made the commitment to never smoke again. I promised myself that no matter what -no matter how hard it was or how angry I got - I would never EVER take another puff of a cigarette. Now here I am and all the withdrawals, obsessing, stressing and general madness that went along with the first days, weeks and months of my quit are all just very faded memories. I rarely even think about cigarettes anymore and when I do, it's hard to believe I ever smoked at all. It's just such a foreign concept. My girlfriend honestly forgets that I ever smoked and if I happen to tell people I've met that I used to smoke, they can't imagine it. I never thought I would NOT be thought of as a smoker. It's a pretty amazing feeling. I smoked a pack a day for thirty years and was as addicted as anyone and if I can quit, anyone can. YOU can! If you're struggling, stick with it. If you feel weak, post an SOS here. Make the commitment to never smoke again and honor that commitment Every. Single Day. Your life depends on it! YOU CAN DO THIS!!!!
    13 points
  14. Thanks for the shout out people!! 5 years is quite a milestone for sure and I have never regretted having made the commitment to quit despite the difficulties in the early days. All the newbies need to know it's possible for all who put in the work to find their freedom from nicotine addiction. The difficulties and doubts fade away and are replaced by rewards that last a lifetime! As for me - the wife & I are livin' the good life on the beach in Mexico playin' in the sun
    13 points
  15. 13 points
  16. Growing up in So Cal ive always been athletic and enjoyed outdoor sports. All of them. Smoking interfered with my performance so it had to go. Successfully quit once for almost 10 years, then took a puff and was hooked again for 7 years before my final quit in Feb 2021. I own a contracting company that deals with fire protection and im sure I looked stoopid puffing on a grit I now own the fact im an addict, and I can never ever take even one puff and im good with that. Now that im smoke free im back to playing ice hockey and running triathlons at 55+ years old and in great shape & kicking butt This site is key to my quit-
    13 points
  17. Ok.... Listen up !!!! This is not a crime ...more of a Dam Shame.... What IS a Crime is you not coming back and trying again ... Never Give Up....Giving Up.....Smoking Kills....People die far too young Risking your Health ....That's A Crime .... We have plenty of seats ...just pick one ,let's try again ... You know deep down Quitting is the most sensible thing to do ...
    13 points
  18. It's really good to see you here .... This means you want to rid yourself of the horrible addiction of smoking nicotine ....I was where you are once ....just trying to find that one thing that would free me once and for all of my 52 year smoking addiction .... I had tried every method know to man ...always to end up back to smoking ... I was given a sharp shock .... prospect of losing a limb or two...all of a sudden Just trying wasn't a option it was time to do.... I smoked my last 3 ciggerette,s...with tears flowing ... How would I manage without my crutch ..my friend for so many years ....I searched the web looking for that one thing I hadn't tried ... I stumbled on a group of people ...QSMB ....then The Quit Train .... They gave me the Knowledge...showed me the way ....armed me with my tools to beat this monster....they guided me every step of the way .People from all over the world ,they cared ,they understood .... I did it ...I free,d myself ....I still feel that sense of pride ... I stay to tell anyone that will listen ....jump on the Train....give yourself the best Chance you can to free yourself.....your so worth it ....don't be shy... It's your life ...and you only get one ..... We will welcome you ...
    13 points
  19. 13 points
  20. 13 points
  21. Hey Guys ...yes ..you ....the Newbies ... Where are you ???.... Come and tell us ....were missing you around here .... Us Oldies ,sitting here twiddling our thumbs ...we want to help... Give us something to do .... And if anyone else wants to take a seat ..there is plenty ...just jump on ... You won't regret it .... Make the move ...Change your life .... See you all soon
    12 points
  22. Hello everyone. Hope all is safe and sound. Staying healthy, I hope. Today I am celebrating my 90th day off Cigarettes! I am doing just Great and feeling terrific! I want to mention that w/o my beautiful wife of almost 27 years and the people here, that I don't know where I would be. A very big Thanks!!! SAL and Anita
    12 points
  23. Welcome aboard the Quit Train Happy Passenger. Good call on giving up the smokes. Enjoy the ride.
    12 points
  24. Good for you Happy Passenger. You have the power and strength to quit. Keep telling yourself you no longer smoke and power through the cravings. The nicotine is gone after a couple of days and then you learn to redirect those thoughts. Stay close to the forum, educate yourself, play some games and get to know us. We would love to help you along your journey.
    12 points
  25. Hello HappyPassenger Welcome to the train. I stayed logged on the boards when I quit (even if I was not always reading something) it simply made me feel safer and saner to know I could reach out at any time. notsmokjo is correct there a lot of resources available here. Please do take advantage of that and the fun ones too (songs, games ect) Best wishes!
    12 points
  26. I’m a newcomer pinging in to say hello. I’ve been lurking on the site for a while, but I set up a profile today so that I could participate. Thanks for the experiences and the compassionate, nonjudgmental encouragement shared here. Reading the info and comments has helped me through some white-knuckle moments. My last smoke was 17 days ago. It was not a planned quit. I was having oral surgery, and at midnight the night before I learned that smoking through the post-op was a really bad idea. (As if all the other harms of smoking for the last 40 years were somehow a really good idea?! Yeah, go figure.) Anyway, I slammed into this quit bass ackwards… unprepared mentally, emotionally or physically. I didn’t have any tools to hand, and hadn’t thought through how to be intentional to set myself up to succeed. Just boom. But I’m trying hard to make it work. There’s more than just a dental emergency at play. I want this quit and the suffering it entails to count for something. I’ve been ambivalent about smoking for some time, have been living in denial about the consequences, and have let smoking control my life for too long. Cold turkey was not an option for me, personally. (Did that before, didn’t stick.) So I’m using the patch on a step-down system. I’m constantly fiddling with silly putty. Trying to stay busy. Doing a lot of wall pushups. Attempting to stay positive. Getting a grip on my triggers. Making lists of alternative things to do in those moments. Re-reading the science. Doing more wall push-ups. I’m struggling with feelings of despair and intense physical discomfort as my body adjusts to a lot less nicotine. But this week, on average, was a bit easier than the last. So maybe that’s progress? I think addiction likes to hide in the dark. It feeds on shame and distortions, and whispers false justifications to us. So I guess part of why I am joining this QT community is to fend off those shadows by reaching out for reinforcement, to try to fill my brain with something different. I need to banish that voice from the dark that says nicotine is my best friend (it’s not) and says that I can’t exist without my smokes (I can, and I have 17 days of evidence to prove it). Today I am grateful for having your voices in my head, instead. You are helping me to rewire. Thanks for listening and bearing witness in return. DenaliBlues
    12 points
  27. 9 years free today for me and quita wow
    12 points
  28. It's a New Month .... Who,s sitting on the Train ....stand up and be Counted Horney Toad is here of course ....
    12 points
  29. Still on the train! Day 21.
    12 points
  30. 12 points
  31. To all new quitters !! Dont let the holiday season give you a excuse to throw your life saving quit Down the toilet ... Your life may depend on it .... Please use the SOS thread ,if you feel your quit is in trouble ... Or PM either me or Jillar .... I'm sure we will not be too far away .... I will have my frying pan at the ready ....be warned .... Be careful of your alcohol in take ....I've seen many quits fail due to thinking they could handle the booze .... Merry Xmas Newbies ,not so New ,and Oldies ...
    12 points
  32. Hi everyone. I don't really know how to start this...so here goes... My name is Ron. Some of you may remember me from a long time ago. The QT and QSMB community really helped me quit way back in Dec 2013. Feels like a lifetime ago. I "met" a lot of good people who helped me stay smoke free for over 5 years. I'm hoping you all can help me once again...but this time, quit for good. You see, I never got to my 6 year quit anniversary. Just a few months before that time, at the end of the night of my bachelor party, I made a drunken decision to smoke. Being drunk isn't an excuse. I wanted to smoke. I messed up, plain and simple. That was 3 years ago in 2018. I've been smoking on and off ever since. So let me be the poster boy of what can happen when you take your quit for granted. I look around here now and I see familiar names and faces who started their quit around the same time as I did...and while I'm happy to see them, I am also filled with embarrassment and envy because I threw mine away. But that quit is loooonnng gone. I am here today, back as a newbie once again. But this time, I want to quit for good for my 1 year old son. He means everything to me and I want to be around for him as long as I possibly can. Thanks for reading. Today is my 3rd day going smoke free.
    12 points
  33. It's been roughly 518 days or 1 year 5 months and 28 days since my last smoke. I've had many craves along the way but everyone one of them was easily manageable. I can be done.
    12 points
  34. One week until 20 years. The life we all live has/had nothing to do with smoking tobacco. It never did! Smoking was incorporated into our lives and only brought weeds. Wastage of time, money, health, addiction. Quitting is/was never a problem. It is only a process we all go through. If someone had told me when I was 39 that I would quit for 20 years I would have raised my cynical eyes more at myself than the statement. Having “giving” up smoking over a thousand times in various increments of time. I deemed myself a weak, spineless jellyfish. My friends had quit for 15 years over a £10 bet; yet I an educated person could not find a logical/spiritual plan. If someone had asked me at 40 that I would quit for 20 years. I would probably have agreed. What made the difference was not a convergence of the planets or meeting a guru. I realised that the problem was right under my nose. I kept smoking! I kept smoking after various holidays from smoking. From a minute until a year.... Why did I keep going back even when I had gone through the initial turmoil of early quitting? My answer was I must not smoke ever again in my life. Eureka! What ever happened I would not smoke until I died. The idea clicked. This was before I had ever heard abut NOPE. I love NOPE and what it means. There is no reason why I can/should/will ever smoke. As the months passed it dawned on me that not only is there a chasm between life and quitting smoking but they are only connected by a memory. Quitting plays no role in heartbreak/love within your life. It is a process that goes along like breathing and your heart beat. You have to stay still to detect it. It gets much harder to detect the “quit” after 2 years. You can even forget the date you quit. Hard to believe after 3 months. For me it felt “normal” not to smoke after 7 months. Life just went on... After 15 months it felt “natural” to be a non smoker. I felt like a non smoker.. Only 15 months and since then I have felt the same way. It does not get better and better. IMO eventually you settle into being a non smoker. The best celebration without a doubt us the first year. So much has happened. 4 seasons and so many things have changed in your conscious/unconscious life. The pinnacle as your so aware of it. Bathe in it..... By now you should have encompassed some extremes in your life. If not remember life and quitting are not entwined. You made your decision to quit and life will throw an extreme event. Once you have traversed this- you are practically there. Last month I carried my mother's coffin into church. 13 years I did the same with my father. Smoking and grief are not compatible to a non smoker. I saw that NOPE means “Never”. YOU>QUIT>LIFE Protect your “quit” from the endless events of life. This board is really for people in the first year and especially the first few weeks. It feels like being in a fog the first few weeks/ months. You must have faith that the fog will clear. It always does.... It is not a cliché, “ if I can do it , anyone can”. Most people looking back feel how fragile the start was. A minute/hour/day is often what matters in the beginning.. The same for me and everyone but it does change and quicker than you think, but the first year is critical. As the years go by you forget but I gave upon my birthday, so a double celebration. 20 years quit and 60 years of age. NOPE
    12 points
  35. 6 months!! I never would have actually thought I would make it this far! One thing is for sure, looking back…I’ll never go through that again!!! Smoke free for life!!! Thanks everyone for all the support and advice along the way! QuitTrain, her crew, and fellow passengers are the best!!!!
    12 points
  36. OK so it's not the one year or two year, but I'm so happy to see 1 year six months! (And a few days) Eating Hagen Dazs strawberry vanilla ice cream to celebrate.
    12 points
  37. I throw on my 58,043 Cancer cigs I haven't smoked .... In Honour of my Dear Friend and all the good Folks who have lost their lives to this horrible addiction.... Burn !!!!!
    12 points
  38. Thank you Nancy for Remembering ....8 years ago a desperate Quitter stumbled your way ... You reached a hand out to me ...gave me a name ,and became my Guardian Angel .... I will love you forever . Since then I have met the wonderful People ....my heart is big and you all fit in there .... I have so many friends here ,who I will remember always ..... I Find it hard to believe it's 8 years ....it's flown by .... It's weird at the beginning you are counting the minutes ,hours ,days and weeks....and now years pass .... I still get that huge sense of pride ,when another milestone comes up .... And beat the air....I Finally Did It ...!!!!!! Thank you Quit Train ...and all its members passed and present ....your the reason I stay .... To get you that magic feeling and the buzz ,when you know you have kicked this horrible addiction ... Feel proud ....not every smoker makes it .... Love to you all....
    12 points
  39. First a sausage picture for Doreen: In the first year of my quit (seems like yesterday) I wrote this: The Great Escape We were in prison. We weren’t sure of it, but we were on death row. We had seen others killed. The rules requiring a swift and humane execution were not guaranteed. In fact, the torture of slow poison was in motion. What bugged us most was not the prison or even the death sentence, but that the punishment seemed way out of proportion to our crime. It was unfair. There had been rumors of escape, but even so, our cells were solid brick. They happened somewhere else. We had run at the walls before to no avail. If we escaped, surely we would be recaptured and our imprisonment would be made even more severe. We were comfortable in our cells. It was our choice. We heard a whisper. It was so soft we could barely hear it. “If you say NOPE and laugh in Spanish like this, jajajajaja, you can walk right through the wall to freedom for ever.” That’s crazy, feel how thick and hard these walls are – there is no way we could walk through them. We’re not strong enough. What’s on the other side anyway? Tomorrow, maybe. Finally we tried it, and it worked! We ESCAPED! The wall wasn’t solid, it was made of smoke. We passed right through it. We were free. Now we help others when they escape and are blinded by sunshine and overwhelmed by fresh air. And we whisper to those still in prison, “If you say NOPE and laugh in Spanish like this, jajajajaja, you can walk right through the wall to freedom for ever.”
    12 points
  40. I'll toss on a cool 32,760. It's so rare that I think about smoking anymore that that number completely blows my mind.
    12 points
  41. I'll gladly chuck 60,950 coffin nails on the pyre.
    12 points
  42. Here are my 36,542. Good riddance.
    12 points
  43. 12 points
  44. Present and accounted for.
    11 points
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QuitTrain®, a quit smoking support community, was created by former smokers who have a deep desire to help people quit smoking and to help keep those quits intact.  This place should be a safe haven to escape the daily grind and focus on protecting our quits.  We don't believe that there is a "one size fits all" approach when it comes to quitting smoking.  Each of us has our own unique set of circumstances which contributes to how we go about quitting and more importantly, how we keep our quits.

 

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