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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/29/22 in all areas

  1. Thank you to everyone for all the information on this site, I have been reading/learning since early this am. Preparing to quit Monday the 4th, taken the week off work to work through what I see as the toughest part (withdrawal's). I have quit various times in the past but never made it for more than a couple years, so am still hooked after 35years. My Son gave me some words of encouragement when talking about quitting with him last week, he text me "yep, think of all the stuff you've overcome ... quitting smoking wont seem as bad after" so that is my user name (overcome). Ordered Allen Carr's book so will read that tomorrow. Again thanks to all for the info and support.
    10 points
  2. G’day NOPE .....Not One Puff Ever.... (replace Ever with Min,Hour, Day as required)
    8 points
  3. G’day NOPE .....Not One Puff Ever.... (replace Ever with Min,Hour, Day as required)
    8 points
  4. Apart from reading this board, another thing that really helped me get through the first few weeks was to stay busy. Lots of physical activity. Tasks to keep my hands occupied. Mindless stuff listed out in advance (because the brainfog really clobbered me). Just constant motion. Not only did that help me power through the cravings, it helped me manage the cauldron of feelings that surfaced, as well. (“Dunno what to do with that emotion… oh well I guess I’ll just wash the car windows.”) Glad you have nicotine lozenges in your quit kit. I found the fruit minis to be very helpful in a pinch. I, too, lost a multi-year quit once. Thought I could be a casual/occasional smoker. But that was a delusion… within a month of my “just for tonight” choice I was back to more than a pack a day, with nicotine controlling me. It took me decades to quit again. This QuitTrain group is a big part of my quitting commitment this time… it’s helpful to have such a wonderful group of supportive people and accountability buddies who understand what quitting is like. Good luck with your count-down today!
    8 points
  5. Welcome Overcome, you are truly making the best decision of your life. Just grab a seat on the train and start your journey to a happier and healthier life. Look at all the many articles and videos that are available here because knowledge is power. Plus, lean on us because we will be here to support you the whole way. You can do this just Believe in yourself and have faith.
    8 points
  6. Welcome aboard @overcome! You have come to an amazing place for support in your quit! I could not have quit without this site. There is an amazing group of quitters on here that are committed to helping others do the same. What helped me the most during my initial quit was reading all of the threads I came across on this site and they helped even more than the videos and the book, but arming yourself with knowledge about your enemy and yourself is the key to victory! I look forward to following your quit!
    8 points
  7. G'day mate and welcome aboard. In the first few weeks I had an app on my phone to help chart my quit. So the two best things I got from the app were the random sms messages I'd get that would say...1 hour smoke free and then a little medical fact about what that had done for my body. The other thing I loved as a little memory game to help get through craves...it was just a turn over the cards and find the match, it was timed forc3 minutes...just enough time to beat the craves. I used nrt chewies (gum) and that worked for me. So onto the pointy bit of this post... I am another who had a long quit and lost it...sure there were circumstances that contributed to me smoking again but in retrospect I chose to put something in my mouth, light it and smoke it. What I learnt is that for me I am only 1 puff away from a pack a day. I don't constantly crave a smoke anymore but the knowledge that for me, even though I will never smoke again, I'm like an alcoholic and I will always be a smoker, I just choose not to smoke. Kinda like a dormant volcano, I'm a dormant smoker. I don't want one anymore, plenty of stresses have pushed my buttons and I've not even been tempted but I'm always ready incase they do. I have a plan for if that urge comes and of got a train load of mates to talk ne off a ledge. Best advice anyone gave me during my quit.... you only need to quit fir one day ...... those days just add up to forever. You wake up and say to yourself, I will not smoke today and then repeat it. Once you've done it once, you know you can...I mean come on, it's inly 1 day.
    8 points
  8. G’day NOPE .....Not One Puff Ever.... (replace Ever with Min,Hour, Day as required)
    8 points
  9. 8 points
  10. There are some tough battles along the way; no question but. anyone can make it through those times with a strong commitment to be free from nicotine's control. You are not only battling addiction withdrawal but more significantly over the longer term you are restructuring your entire daily life to exclude cigarettes. That's what takes the longest time - finding and becoming comfortable with your 'new lifestyle' that doesn't include smoking!
    7 points
  11. I am GREAT Doreensfree thank you! So far I have been holding the big monster (Allen Carrs description), back to more of a little monster. I do wish I would have had time to read Allens whole book but it arrived late. So when I have time I am trying to get through it. I feel SO EXCITED, I am not a failure, I can do this with what I have learned while reading on the train and you all's support. Physically, breathing has improved, taste is a little different, feeling a little stressed but nothing terrible. My mind is on alert constantly for the little and sometimes big zingers from the addiction monster. which is taxing but only last a minute or three ( I have been timing them). Thank you all again!
    7 points
  12. Welcome aboard and stick close. Keep busy and realize there will be stressful times but believe in yourself that you can handle this. No special gifts here for those of us that have made it. Just tired of the addiction and realize it for what it is. I smoked for a long time also and after the first few weeks was surprised that it was not as difficult as I imagined. Believe in yourself that you can handle this because you can if you really want it. Stay close and reach out if need be. Best wishes.
    7 points
  13. 7 points
  14. We are here for you @overcome! Just stick close to us this week and don’t forget about our SOS forum!
    7 points
  15. Welcome O to the first day of being a wonderful Non Smoker ... Take in that lovely clean air ...Deep breaths .... Why not go take your first day NOPE....I found this a powerful tool to have ..it was a promise to my self . Just for this day ..I wouldn't smoke .. Buckle up...there will be some bends in the track ...
    7 points
  16. This addiction is crazy, I am working on finishing my last two cigarettes' tonight and head for bed. Only to be anxiously be waiting for tomorrow when I can start trying to flush out all the nicotine in my body as fast as I can, crazy! I have learned a lot here, thanks for you all's support.
    7 points
  17. G’day NOPE .....Not One Puff Ever....
    7 points
  18. Hi, @overcome - great to meet you, and welcome to the Train. There are a lot of good people and posts here that have helped me pull through difficulties of quitting. We’ve all been through hard times, ourselves, and we’re standing by to help other newcomers. +1 to what you and @johnny5 said about reflecting on where former quits came unraveled. Coming to terms with our triggers and rewiring how we react to them (without nicotine) is a big part of the recovery process. But worth it to get free! You can do it!
    7 points
  19. Thank you everyone for the encouragement, warm welcome and allowing me on to the train! Spent time with wifee picking up juice and good food for next week. One of the big hitters for me was learning about the blood sugar drop. Last time I tried to quit a few years ago, my heart was beating so fast, thought I was going to have a heart attack. Trying to be a little more prepared this time when I quit for good. We also picked up some NRT lozenges that I hope to not use but have just in case, what ever it takes. I do agree with what one person wrote though, the battle will be won in the mind. This was the case long ago when I quit using Alcohol, simple, dont take a drink, not easy though. Like NOPE, Not One Puff Ever, simple, not easy. Forgot to mention, seeing all of your quit dates is encouraging, congratulations to you all!
    7 points
  20. I believe support is key to a successful quit & there's plenty of support here! Welcome on board the train
    7 points
  21. Welcome @overcome, you've come to the right place for your forever quit. Maybe all you need to stay quit once and for all is a group of people to talk you down off the ledge when you feel like you might cave to a crave. There's almost always someone here 24/7 and it doesn't matter how long you've been quit. If you need extra support, we're here to give it. Just post in the SOS forum and we'll do our best to help you through it
    7 points
  22. Welcome to QuitTrain, @overcome and congratulations on deciding to quit smoking. You are doing a great thing. It is also great that your son supports you in this. Support from family and friends can really help. I do recommend Allen Carr's book. People have various reactions to the book but it really helped me. One of the big things that I took from it was the idea that smoking really provided nothing good to the smoker. It fed a temporary crave but that crave would come back. The best thing is to leave the smokes behind once and for all because nothing good comes from it, only bad (disease, wasting money, etc.) I am concerned about you saying that you had made it a couple of years in a quit (or a stop). I had several unsuccessful quits before quitting for good but they were far shorter. I think it is good for you to think about what triggered you to relapse after a quit that long. Identifying that trigger and developing coping mechanisms for overcoming that type of trigger really helps. Also, there is a NOPE pledge on this site. You can pledge NOPE (Not One Puff Ever) meaning that you will not smoke, even if it is for one day at a time. That can really help. Also, take it one moment and day at a time and your quit will grow. There is a lot of support and knowledge, along with offbeat games and distractions, that can help you on your quit journey here. Welcome. It is good to have you here.
    7 points
  23. Nope...just can't do it !!!
    7 points
  24. G’day NOPE .....Not One Puff Ever.... (replace Ever with Min,Hour, Day as required)
    6 points
  25. Welcome aboard Overcome. Congratulations on quitting smoking. Once you realize that the monster has as much or as little power as you give him, he looks far less scary...more pest than monster. Face him down. See the monster for what he actually is. Then, give him a swift kick in the ass and send him on his way. Ride on! You only pick up more wins along the way.
    6 points
  26. Nope, Nope, Nope, Nope, Nope, Nope!
    6 points
  27. Stick close in the beginning days @overcome, we got your back This addiction is crazy but you're well prepared for it. Drink lots of water or juice to help flush it out. The nicotine takes about three days to leave your body
    6 points
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QuitTrain®, a quit smoking support community, was created by former smokers who have a deep desire to help people quit smoking and to help keep those quits intact.  This place should be a safe haven to escape the daily grind and focus on protecting our quits.  We don't believe that there is a "one size fits all" approach when it comes to quitting smoking.  Each of us has our own unique set of circumstances which contributes to how we go about quitting and more importantly, how we keep our quits.

 

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