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Sazerac

Decisions/Resolve

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Some quit on a whim,

others quit making a sensible plan and map it all out as best they can.

There are many successful quits between the extremes.

 

The important bit is the seminal moment in your life when you say,

'I quit smoking'.

 

 

I spontaneously said,

'I've quit.

If I don't feel better in a few days, I can always smoke

but, let's see your mettle and give this an honest try'

 

I had no idea the process took a lot longer than a few days.

I had no concept at all about nicotine addiction.  I was supremely ignorant.

 

To be honest, it actually takes nicotine a lot longer

than a few days to completely leave your body.

 

Think about it...we have nicotine infested tar in our lungs clinging to our cilia. 

Tar, ffs.  This doesn't disapate in a few days.

Ever have tar on your feet ?  It takes a solvent like gasoline to remove it.

 

The miracle is that our bodies do purge themselves of most. 

 

Still, remnants remain.

Remants remain forever in our DNA.

A sobering fact.

 

After a few days, gathering more knowledge about addiction,

I extended the premise of starting smoking again

'if I don't feel better in ...days...weeks...'

 

Some days, I thought, if I don't feel better in five minutes I can always smoke.

There were many times when acknowledging the choice saved my quit.

 

My decision to quit smoking held

and my resolve to commit to this choice grew minute by minute.

It grew by quantumn leaps every damn crave I beat.

 

I'm sharing this thinking about new quitters

and

smokers on the fence, 

before the choice to quit becomes clear and non negotiable.

 

You may not have a serious dose of resolve about your decision to quit.

 

Do not worry about this, resolve grows with knowledge and time.

After a while there should be no turning back,

you will know too much and will have a deeper power committing to your decision.

 

This decision to quit smoking is one of the best decisions you can make in your life.

It teaches you about commitment.  It nurtures your self respect, self confidence.

It saves your life.

 

 

 

 

 

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Great post Sally, thank you for sharing :)

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Quit on a whim or plan a quit. Ive did both. Planning doesnt 'prepare' you. It just prolongs the inevitable. That scared, uncertainty you feel when you begin a quit... we all feel...whether planned or not. You never feel 'ready' to quit. You just have to go for it, with gusto! 

I had seven planned quits prior to this on a whim quit, so i am all for on a whim quits. But know, of course, planned quits do work also. Horses for courses, we are all individuals. Just Not One Puff Ever! Make ya mind up and go for it! 

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2 hours ago, Sazerac said:

You may not have a serious dose of resolve about your decision to quit.

 

Do not worry about this,

resolve grows with knowledge and time.

 

Brilliant post and absolutely this!

 

I did not have a clue when I set out, but the further down the path I get the bigger the accomplishment and the more precious that accomplishment is.

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Very nice post Saz that captures the essence of our early quit :)

 

I think many of us are the same Sslip! No clue at first and full of fear and trepidation over what will happen to us as we start out on this journey.

After a while, we realize hey, maybe we CAN actually do this because we are making good progress toward our ultimate goal.

 

You just passed your 6 month mark. Can you even imagine giving up all you have fought for to date - NOPE!

Edited by reciprocity
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My only plan was to keep hold of my two feet ..that were in danger of leaving my body ,if I continued to smoke..

I had to make the decision ..keep the quit and feet...or smoke and amputation....

This is as real as it gets folks...

Thankfully.. I chose correctly....

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On 7/10/2018 at 4:33 PM, Sazerac said:

 

The decision to quit smoking is one of the best decisions you can make in your life.

 

 

 

 

 

The "decision to quit" means exactly fark-all-diddley-squat without the ... y'know ... actual act of quitting ... right? 

Literally millions of folk a day "decide" to quit ... yet never act on said decision. 


EZPZ. 

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Quitting....its not normally something you just happen upon by accident though is it sarge? A decision to quit comes before most quits, so nothing to be scoffed at. 

 

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11 minutes ago, sgt.barney said:

 

 

The "decision to quit" means exactly fark-all-diddley-squat without the ... y'know ... actual act of quitting ... right? 

Literally millions of folk a day "decide" to quit ... yet never act on said decision. 


EZPZ. 

The decision to quit is only step one. You haven't actually started to quit at the moment you make that decision. Sure, some don't act on their decision but others do. Some, like you, me and a lot of others here, acted on that decision to quit and are still doing so. It really boils down to how badly you want it once you make that decision.

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It has to be a decision to quit...then choose to do it ..or not..

Your right millions make a decision, and don't quit..but isn't that thier choice to do nothing...

If I make a decision to make a cheese sandwich and don't...that's my choice... And I missed out on a dam good butty....

 

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I certainly made the decision to quit

and

made the decision to commit to my quit.

Everyday I make this decision.

Everyday I stand by my decision.

 

Usually when thoughtful decisions take precedence over my actions

chaos remains at bay.

When actions take precedence over thoughtful decisions....

Well.  You.  Can.  Imagine.

 

 

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The rush of 2019 resolutions may be swirling around.

Quitting smoking and dealing with Nicotine Addiction is a popular one and ultimately do-able.  

You can quit smoking.  We quit smoking and we are not special, just committed. 

 

You will gain the gifts of self-confidence and trust in yourself.

It is a supreme gift to give your family and loved ones,  as well as yourself.

Nobody wants to witness or experience a life of nicotine addiction, a smoking related illness or a horrifying death.

Nobody.

So, consider quitting smoking.

If you are a new quitter or an elder, protect your quit.  You have won. 

 

 

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I still get that sense of pride ...I quit .....I won....even after five years...

I beat the nico monster after 52 years ....

If I can ...you can too.....what have you got to lose ...nothing ....but just imagine what you can gain !!!!

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Or if you're like me and make your New Year's resolution each year to quit smoking but then break it, consider quitting before New Years and start 2019 as an ex smoker :)

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On 7/10/2018 at 1:33 PM, Sazerac said:

 

I'm sharing this thinking about smokers on the fence,

before the choice to quit becomes clear and non negotiable.

You may not have a serious dose of resolve about your decision to quit.

 

Do not worry about this,

resolve grows with knowledge and time.

After a while there should be no turning back,

you will know too much and will have power to commit to your decision.

 

Thinking through this post of yours, Sazerac. Especially this part, above.

 

When I got my new job at a health food store, I said to myself that I'd quit when I started the job--we're strictly forbidden to smell like smoke.

Instead, I figured out how to not smell like smoke. (Elaborate, won't even go there.)

 

The new job came with medical insurance--tons cheaper for nonsmokers.

So every pack I smoked was definitely going to be the last pack. I was resolved, every time.  Months.

 

I opted in for smoking cessation coaching with the health insurance company so they'd know I was serious about quitting.  I knew the clock was ticking and I'd have to actually quit.

December 14th was the drop dead date, conclusion of the program. 

 

December 12th I passed a trash can and tossed in what I had left of cigarettes. 

What was I thinking?! Perfectly good cigarettes! I could have smoked for two more days!  Yes, seriously, what was I thinking?

 

You said, "you may not have a serious dose of resolve about your decision to quit."  That was true for me, I wasn't seriously resolved about quitting on the day when I quit; I was seriously ruminating on how I could keep smoking for as long as possible. For that day, I had put on a patch and was just going to not smoke during the day. I planned to smoke again that night. Just in case I felt panicked at lunch break, I had them with me in my purse. I'd remove the patch and smoke.

 

Now I've been through three days of refusing to smoke (nights don't count; I'm asleep). I've thought about starting up and quitting later. If I hadn't returned to this forum and posted, I know I'd have gone back to smoking.

I'm reading through posts and being reminded of the great things I learned at the QSMB and Joel Spitzer's library, etc. It's great to find that wisdom through people posting at Quittrain.

I think you're right, Sazerac. I think that as long as I stay here, keep learning and being reminded about being free of smoking/nicotine, resolve will grow, power will grow. 

I'm not going to get complacent about having quit, I don't trust myself any further than the next few hours, but I do take heart with your post about a person reaching a point where knowledge and power make it possible to stay quit. 

At this moment, I really, really (etc) want a cigarette. The only reason I don't have one in my hand right now is that I am typing this. And editing it. I need a doughnut. 

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Have a doughnut @Kate18, you deserve it :) Quitting ain't for sissies that's for sure so take this time to spoil yourself. Listen to your body as it heals from all the damage done over the years. If it's tired, sleep. If it's hungry, eat. This is the time to be selfish and focus on yourself and quitting. What a great way to start 2019 right?!

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16 hours ago, Kate18 said:

I think that as long as I stay here, keep learning and being reminded about being free of smoking/nicotine, resolve will grow, power will grow. 

I'm not going to get complacent about having quit, I don't trust myself any further than the next few hours, but I do take heart with your post about a person reaching a point where knowledge and power make it possible to stay quit. 

 

Darlin' Kate.

This is exactly how you build a successful quit

and You will succeed.

Stay vigilant and NOPE your way through any and all situations.

You are doing great.

S

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On 7/10/2018 at 1:33 PM, Sazerac said:

 

The important bit is the seminal moment in your life when you say,

'I'm going to quit smoking'. . . .

 

If I don't feel better in a few days, I can always smoke . . . .

 

After a few days, gathering more knowledge about addiction,

I extended the premise of starting smoking again

'if I don't feel better in ...days...weeks...'

but some days, I thought, if I don't feel better in five minutes I can always smoke.

There were many times when acknowledging the choice saved my quit.

 

 

 

 

Made it through day three, my Danger Day. 

Awoke craving and with panicky feelings, day four.  I don't wear a patch at night because of disturbed sleep.  Forgot to put one on yesterday morning until too late. I was going to sleep early to dispel disturbing intrusive thoughts.

As I was making coffee, I had fearful images of something terrible happening to my children and theirs. Made me weepy.  Felt strongly motivated to go to the gas station and buy cigarettes.

"This is biochemical," I said to myself. 

Slapped on a patch.  Just deal with the stress of changing habits first, then chemical withdrawal. 

One step at a time. One day at a time. Until this patch kicks in right now, and my monkey-mind quiets down and stops projecting tragic images, I'm taking one minute at a time. 

I really, really want a smoke. Fortunately, I have to get ready for work. 

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If taking it minute by minute helps ....then good ....

Please don't believe the cigarette offers you something ....it's the opposite ...it makes you more stressed ....

Please take the time Kate to read everything you can here....once you see smoking for what it really is and does to us ...the quit becomes easier...

If you havnt read Allen Carr the Easy Way ....I strongly suggest you do ...this book has helped millions ...me included.....

Don't smoke ....fight for your Freedom...

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9 hours ago, Doreensfree said:

 

If you havnt read Allen Carr the Easy Way ....I strongly suggest you do ...this book has helped millions ...me included.....

Don't smoke ....fight for your Freedom...

Thanks, Doreen. I think I have an online version of Allen Carr somewhere. Think I saw it. If I can't find it online, I'll borrow from the library.

 

Thanks so much

 

This was a rough day. I almost can't believe I'm still here. It's a curious feeling, to have wanted so badly to smoke, but for once, I didn't. 

I credit this forum for a lot of the strength I found to stay free of cigarettes 

Edited by Kate18
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On 7/10/2018 at 3:33 PM, Sazerac said:

Some quit on a whim,

others quit making a sensible plan and map it all out as best they can.

There are many successful quits between the extremes.

 

The important bit is the seminal moment in your life when you say,

'I quit smoking'.

 

 

I spontaneously said,

'I've quit.

If I don't feel better in a few days, I can always smoke

but, let's see your mettle and give this an honest try'

 

I had no idea the process took a lot longer than a few days.

I had no concept at all about nicotine addiction.  I was supremely ignorant.

 

To be honest, it actually takes nicotine a lot longer

than a few days to completely leave your body.

 

Think about it...we have nicotine infested tar in our lungs clinging to our cilia. 

Tar, ffs.  This doesn't disapate in a few days.

Ever have tar on your feet ?  It takes a solvent like gasoline to remove it.

 

The miracle is that our bodies do purge themselves of most. 

 

Still, remnants remain.

Remants remain forever in our DNA.

A sobering fact.

 

After a few days, gathering more knowledge about addiction,

I extended the premise of starting smoking again

'if I don't feel better in ...days...weeks...'

 

Some days, I thought, if I don't feel better in five minutes I can always smoke.

There were many times when acknowledging the choice saved my quit.

 

My decision to quit smoking held

and my resolve to commit to this choice grew minute by minute.

It grew by quantumn leaps every damn crave I beat.

 

I'm sharing this thinking about new quitters

and

smokers on the fence, 

before the choice to quit becomes clear and non negotiable.

 

You may not have a serious dose of resolve about your decision to quit.

 

Do not worry about this, resolve grows with knowledge and time.

After a while there should be no turning back,

you will know too much and will have a deeper power committing to your decision.

 

This decision to quit smoking is one of the best decisions you can make in your life.

It teaches you about commitment.  It nurtures your self respect, self confidence.

It saves your life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bumpity

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On 7/10/2018 at 4:33 PM, Sazerac said:

After a few days, gathering more knowledge about addiction,

I extended the premise of starting smoking again

'if I don't feel better in ...days...weeks...'

 HI! Going through the material that you ask me to read and watch. I came across this part of a post written by you.

 It hit the spot for me. During past quits I have always bargained with myself. I have also said "if I don't feel better in X amount of time I will go back to smoking". I've lost quits this way because I actually thought that I was never going to feel any better. I was lost in a fog and my mind wasn't strong enough to ride it out, no matter how long it lasted Depression had taken me over and all I wanted to do was feel better. The unknown part about all this is how long it will last for me. As Joel says, everyone's quit is different. I'm just happy that I'm not feeling bad enough right now that I have to bargain with myself. It's early in this quit, so maybe I'll bypass that stage this time.

Great post for all to read! Thanks!

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Re:  bargaining.  

There is no bargaining with addiction.  Either you feed the addiction or you don't.

 

I had a moment of clarity realizing I already knew what smoking was like, I knew it well after 40 something years.

It was time to experience something different...Not Smoking.

I was on a new adventure and I love adventures. 

 

I never seriously considered smoking again after I leapt on my whim to quit even though some craves/triggers were challenging. 

I really listened to the truth about nicotine addiction for the first time without denial.

There was no going back, there is no going back.

I remain vigilant, this is the new way of living.  

 

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