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Stop Smoking Recovery Timetable - The Body's Ability To Mend Is Beauty To Behold!

This is so motivating and in fact, it's what I kept handy on my phone when I first quit.  I would look at it several times per day as motivation to keep it moving and not look back.   Within ... 20 minutes Your blood pressure, pulse rate and the temperature of your hands and feet have returned to normal. 8 hours Remaining nicotine in your bloodstream has fallen to 6.25% of normal peak daily levels, a 93.75% reduction. 12 hours Your blood oxygen level has increased to normal. Carbon monoxide levels have dropped to normal. 24 hours Anxieties have peaked in intensity and within two weeks should return to near pre-cessation levels. 48 hours Damaged nerve endings have started to regrow and your sense of smell and taste are beginning to return to normal. Cessation anger and irritability will have peaked. 72 hours Your entire body will test 100% nicotine-free. Over 90% of all nicotine metabolites (the chemicals nicotine breaks down into) have passed from your body via your urine.  Symptoms of chemical withdrawal have peaked in intensity, including restlessness. Unless use cues have been avoided, the number of cue induced crave episodes experienced during any quitting day have peaked for the "average" ex-user. Lung bronchial tubes leading to air sacs (alveoli) are beginning to relax in recovering smokers. Breathing is becoming easier and your lung's functional abilities are improving. 5 - 8 days The "average" ex-smoker is down to experiencing just three cue induced crave episodes per day. Although we may not be "average" and although minutes may feel like hours when normal cessation time distortion combines with the body's panic response, it is unlikely that any single episode will last longer than 3 minutes. Keep a clock handy and time the episode to maintain an honest perspective on time. 10 days The "average" ex-user is down to encountering less than two crave episodes per day. 10 days to 2 weeks Recovery has likely progressed to the point where your addiction is no longer doing the talking. Blood circulation in your gums and teeth are now similar to that of a non-user. 2 to 4 weeks Cessation related anger, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, impatience, insomnia, restlessness and depression have ended. If still experiencing any of these symptoms get seen and evaluated by your physician. 2 weeks to 3 months Your heart attack risk has started to drop. Your lung function has noticeably improved. If your health permits, sample your circulation and lung improvement by walking briskly, climbing stairs or running further or faster than normal. 21 days The number of acetylcholine receptors, which were up-regulated in response to nicotine's presence in the frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem and cerebellum regions of your brain have now substantially down-regulated. Receptor binding has returned to levels seen in the brains of non-smokers (2007 study). 3 weeks to 3 months Your circulation has substantially improved. Walking has become easier. Your chronic cough, if any, has likely disappeared. If not, get seen by a doctor, and sooner if at all concerned, as a chronic cough can be a sign of lung cancer. 4 weeks Plasma suPAR is a stable inflammatory biomarker that helps predict development of diseases ranging from diabetes to cancer in smokers. A 2016 study found that within 4 weeks of quitting smoking, with or without NRT, that suPAR levels in 48 former smokers had fallen from a baseline smoking median of 3.2 ng/ml to levels "no longer significantly different from the never smokers' values" (1.9 ng/ml) 8 weeks Insulin resistance in smokers has normalized despite average weight gain of 2.7 kg (2010 SGR, page 384). 1 to 9 months Any smoking related sinus congestion, fatigue or shortness of breath has decreased. Cilia have regrown in your trachea (windpipe) thereby increasing the ability to sweep dirt and mucus out of your lungs. Your body's overall energy has increased. 1 year Your excess risk of coronary heart disease, heart attack and stroke has dropped to less than half that of a smoker. 5 years Your risk of a subarachnoid hemorrhage has declined to 59% of your risk while still smoking (2012 study). If a female ex-smoker, your risk of developing diabetes is now that of a non-smoker (2001 study). 5 to 15 years Your risk of stroke has declined to that of a non-smoker. 10 years Your risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer is between 30% to 50% of that for a continuing smoker (2005 study). Risk of death from lung cancer has declined by almost half if you were an average smoker (one pack per day).  Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus and pancreas have declined. Risk of developing diabetes for both men and women is now similar to that of a never-smoker (2001 study). 13 years The average smoker lucky enough to live to age 75 has 5.8 fewer teeth than a non-smoker (1998 study). But by year 13 after quitting, your risk of smoking induced tooth loss has declined to that of a never-smoker (2006 study). 15 years Your risk of coronary heart disease is now that of a person who has never smoked. Your risk of pancreatic cancer has declined to that of a never-smoker (2011 study - but note a 2nd pancreatic study making an identical finding at 20 years). 20 years If a female, your excess risk of death from all smoking related causes, including lung disease and cancer, has now reduced to that of a never-smoker (2008 study). Risk of pancreatic cancer has also declined to that of a never-smoker (2011 study). http://whyquit.com/whyquit/A_Benefits_Time_Table.html
 

"Caring For Our Recovery" by John R. Polito

There are three primary factors associated with relapse: (1) rewriting the law of addiction; (2) an excuse; and (3) a vague memory. It doesn't matter if it happens within two hours, two days, two weeks, two months, two years, or twenty, the factors remain the same and apply to all of us. https://www.quittrain.com/topic/7669-caring-for-our-quit-by-john-r-polito/?p=191537

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

NEW VIDEO: When Did I Actually Quit Smoking?

Many long-term former smokers have a difficult time remembering the date or even the year when they actually stopped. This video explains an important underlying message of their inability to recall what many people would think is an unforgettable date. http://www.quittrain.com/topic/2096-video-introduction-to-joel-misc-educational-videos-by-joel/?p=187101

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

Confession Time: Telling All by Sherri L.

TELLING ALL . ( caps are emphasis only)   OUT OF SIGHT , OUT OF MIND ? I Hid cigarettes in my coat pocket and convinced myself I didn't know how they got there. That was CRAFTY , SLY , UNDERHANDED , INTENTIONAL and I AM GUILTY . It never did help me quit .   The DELIBERATE ACTION : I Kept lighters ... threw away the smokes, and the ashtrays, but convinced myself that the lighter was still a necessity to have in the home. They arebut my thinking was much different . It was a DELIBERATE course of action should I not be able to handle the stress of quitting : Should I find a butt to smoke ..I had the lighter . That never helped me quit . That was : STINKING THINKING , and caused EMOTIONAL TORTURE having that lighter tempt me over and over . I often searched for butts ewwww gross ! Cigs were always just a thought away. That was not taking my quit seriously ; that was setting myself up for failure .   THE SECRECY APPROACH : I tried being a closet smoker : That was a lot of work ! Showering : perfume : hand cream . Repeat , then repeat again . I thought I could smoke and get away with it hiding my addiction . No one would know and I could still pretend with all those I loved that I was quit, and at the same time I could still support and feed my craves . That was SNEAKY AND kinda frightening and it only brought on MORE frequent CRAVINGS because I kept feeding them . I felt GUILTY , and ASHAMED . The secrecy approach sure didn’t help me quit !   Was SMOKING really making me HAPPY? . Smoking CONTROLLED my LIFE !   BOLDNESS: Oh I have to share this one lol was I bold or what and rather silly now I think about it . I Went to a park took my cigarettes , hidden of course with my lighter , and sat at a picnic bench . ANXIOUSLY I kept a LOOK OUT, AFRAID of BEING SPOTTED while taking A FEW puffs ( UNDERCOVER of a COAT ) . Oh my gosh what if I got caught !!!!! Grown woman caught Smoking !! I could see the headlines ! She LIED . She wasn't quit !! That was: OUT OF CONTROL , DESPERATION and that caused more of the same . ANXIETY , FEAR , SHAME AND EMBARRASSMENT, and OH MY GOSH , I WAS an ADDICT! How could smoking be "THAT GOOD" to cause this much pain ?   SELFISHNESS: I Smoked while babysitting my sons dog. It was nice to have the company while I was out taking him for a walk or sitting on the balcony petting him . : He died of cancer at 6 years old and broke my sons heart . I miss him too . I wish I hadn't smoked . He gave us unconditional love , I gave him second hand smoke .Tears and sorrow are still shed over that . I blew smoke in the faces of all those I loved, FOR AN ADDICTION !!! MY KIDS SHOULD HAVE COME FIRST / MY GRANDKIDS , MY SIBLINGS , and my FRIENDS. My kids PETS SHOULD HAVE COME FIRST , but I chose cigarettes as my friends ,and MY right over everything else. THAT brought me nothing but GRIEF, SORROW , and SHAME , ANGER and GUILT and the most EMOTIONAL PAIN ever . Smoking was not fun . It didn't make me happy . I began to see smoking for what it was , understanding and seeing the truth . I decided to face my denial, get real with my addiction and stop the insanity .   What has cigarettes done for us .The answer is simply nothing good . It is one of the worst forms of torture ever, and it was slowly killing us . The sad part: we willingly made the choice to do it everyday . We are of so much more worth, and value than that . “   THE ENDING : Quitting got easier once I decided to STOP THE INSANITY, and quit playing games with my quit . I was wasting valuable time .   What did I truly want ? I wanted to quit . I surrendered .     Cigarettes had that much control in my life , but not anymore . I took my power back :) I am glad all of you as well are claiming your power and your freedom from this addiction :) _ Sherri L.

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

New Video: Curiosity Killed The Quit

"Your problem was never being addicted to cigarettes. Your problem was being addicted to nicotine. Ever find yourself curious about exciting new technologies that allow you to smoke without actually smoking real cigarettes?" http://www.quittrain.com/topic/4754-videos-addressing-relapse-prevention/?p=178279

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

VIDEO: What's The Use In Quitting Now?

Most people expressing this sentiment are simply rationalizing their smoking in order to protect their nicotine addiction--a process that if not reversed can end up costing the smoker his or her health and life. http://www.quittrain.com/topic/4753-videos-addressing-issues-early-in-your-quit/?p=172661

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

Our Precious Beth (Queen Greenlover) Has Passed Away

I honestly don't know what to say. I just found out about this and talked to her daughter-in-law on the phone just a few minutes ago. She passed last night and was found this morning. For those of us who've gotten to know Beth over the years, this is a heartbreaking day for everyone, especially her family. Please keep her family in prayers and for those of us who knew her through our smoking support group, please reach out to one another and this is devastating news. She was such a tough lady who inside, was sweet, loving and would do anything for anybody.

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

Video: Life Goes On Without Smoking

This video discusses how it is natural to blame all bad feelings, whether or emotional or physical on the fact that you may have recently quit smoking when other factors may very well be at play. http://www.quittrain.com/topic/4753-videos-addressing-issues-early-in-your-quit/?p=168113

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

 

Does Nicotine Withdrawal Really Last For Months Or Years?

http://www.quittrain.com/topic/4753-videos-addressing-issues-early-in-your-quit/?p=162845 At some Internet sites there are people who try to give all readers the impression that nicotine withdrawal or what they refer to as post acute withdrawal symptoms can last for months or even years after quitting smoking. This video addresses the inaccuracy and the dangers of perpetuating this belief.

MarylandQuitter

MarylandQuitter

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QuitTrain®, a quit smoking support community, was created by former smokers who have a deep desire to help people quit smoking and to help keep those quits intact.  This place should be a safe haven to escape the daily grind and focus on protecting our quits.  We don't believe that there is a "one size fits all" approach when it comes to quitting smoking.  Each of us has our own unique set of circumstances which contributes to how we go about quitting and more importantly, how we keep our quits.

 

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