Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Chrysalis

Pickled Egg Recipe?

Recommended Posts

I'm starting a low-carb diet-- not as strict as some of you, but I'm going to cut down on my carbs significantly both to lose weight and to bring down my glucose numbers (the weight I gained since quitting smoking has GOT to go!). Anyway, I think that it would be fun to snack on pickled eggs instead of chips or crackers. Does anybody know how to pickle eggs? Failing that, does anyone know a good brand of pickled eggs to buy? I don't think that I have ever seen them in a store. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay away from my eggs, they taste fine the way they are...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure you just dunk them in pickling vinegar don't you? That's how I do shallots (mini onions) anyway. xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure you just dunk them in pickling vinegar don't you? That's how I do shallots (mini onions) anyway. xx

Actually, Marti, pickled eggs come in many shapes and sizes. (Just kidding-- they're all the same shape and size. :) ) But they do come in different flavors and colors. The best I ever had were dark, dark brown on the outside and white on the inside. I think that there were cloves in the brine. Really good!

 

Pickled eggs and pickled sausage are old fashioned bar food in the States. It used to be (and maybe it still is) the law that no establishment could serve only alcohol, they had to serve food, too. But people go to bars to drink not to eat, so there was no point in bar owners stocking food and trying to cook and serve meals. Nobody wanted it. So to meet the letter of the law, bars started keeping preserved foods on hand-- for some reason pickled eggs and pickled sausages became the standards. You don't find them in upscale yuppie bars but you do still find them in working class neighborhoods, mill towns, farming communities, etc. Now I would like to make my own. 

 

(Yes, Bakon, the lesson of the day is finished. :) )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not something I've ever made myself (have purchased from the chip shop in my youth) so I checked out a site I trust.

 

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/member-recipes/recipe-detail/3527/

 

Thanks, Sharon. This sounds like a good recipe and I love Jamie Oliver, so I'll try anything he recommends. However, I think that I will leave the spices in the brine rather than strain them out. I like it when flavors get stronger over time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, having thoroughly researched EVERY pickled egg recipe and method known to man (or so it seems). Here is what I decided to try for my first attempt. I chose this mostly because I love McCormick's Mixed Pickling Spice. 

 

12 hard boiled eggs, peeled and pierced with skewer or toothpick

2 c white vinegar
2 c water
2 Tbsp McCormick Mixed Pickling Spice
2 Tbsp pickled jalepeno peppers
2 Tbsp jalepeno pickle juice
4 -6 Tbsp brown sugar (add according to taste)
1 tsp salt
2 tsp garlic paste (or 2 cloves finely minced fresh garlic)

Bring pickling brine to a boil. Simmer 5 minutes and cool to room temp. Put eggs in glass or ceramic container, add brine, cover and refrigerate for 2 weeks.

 

Here are photos of the component parts and then the final assembly. I'll let you know in 2 weeks how they come out. 

pickled_eggs_1.jpg

 

pickled_eggs_2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Karen, I can't get your link to work. Can you post the complete URL rather than try to insert a link?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been seeing a nutritionist lately and eggs are a great form of protein and part of a health diet if you eat them without tons of mayo etc...

 

I've honestly never tried a pickled egg and I am generally not a fan of anything pickled but I am interested in knowing the outcome of this.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Jenny. I'm not a big pickle fan, either. I will occasionally eat a dill pickle or some pickled cauliflower, but  not often. The beauty of pickled eggs is that you first make a brine that you like. Then you use it to pickle your eggs. Some egg recipes add sugar (white or brown) for a sweet and sour taste, some are just vinegar and water (yech!). Some use dill weed and onions for spices and some (like mine and Karen's) use cloves, cinnamon and black pepper. Some use beets for color and sweetness and some don't. It's all a matter of personal preference.  

 

So if you are interested in trying pickled eggs I suggest that you read some recipes until you find one that contains ingredients that you tend to like. Make the brine first and taste it as you go along. Adjust the ingredients to your liking. Then add your eggs and marinate them in the refrigerator for a few weeks. Look at it this way... if you like the brine, you might like the eggs but if you don't like the brine you definitely will NOT like the eggs!

 

Let us know how yours come out. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm like a child when it comes to trying new things Chrys, not terrible brave.  Maybe I can get my husband to do make it...and then I'll try.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Jenny, I started to eat my pickled eggs. It's only been 10 days and my recipe says to wait 3 weeks, but I couldn't resist. I am very happy with them. As I expected, they taste like the brine I made which means that they are MUCH more interesting than plain hard-boiled eggs. I also bought a bag of frozen pearl onions and threw them in the with the eggs. Gave the brine a nice flavor and now I can have pickled onions with my egg snack.  :) I can also keep the brine and just throw in some more hard boiled eggs. I think I'll do that today. 

 

While I am happy with these pickled eggs, I am now curious to try some variations. I think next time I'm going to make "Amish pickled eggs" cured with dill and mustard seed. Sounds yummy!

 

pickled_eggs_final.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished eating the last of my first batch of pickled eggs. I have been tasting them every couple of days and decided that they really do taste best when you leave them in the brine for 3 weeks. Today's eggs were really, really good! I will definitely make those again soon. Meanwhile, I am going to try a different recipe that calls for mustard seed and dill weed. I'll let you know how it goes. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know what Chrys I have never tried a pickled egg! I have seen them in the fish and chip shops but never thought to ever try one. I love pickled food, love the juice from the gherkin jar..I know, I'm strange..lol, so although I don't purchase take away food very often next time I do I'm going to try one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hhhmmmm!!!

Looks like there is some house cleaning going on around here... I like the new organization..  good job!!

 

that being said,, I probably would have missed this thread..  I will be back later with my pickled egg opinions....

 

I think you are all making it way to difficult!!  ttyl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok... I dont work from a recipe but here is how I make pickled eggs....

 

 

ingredients...

8 to 12 hard boiled eggs (shells off )

1 quart of pickled beets (32 oz)

1 large white onion

vinegar

water

ground cloves (optional)

 

What I do....

 slice the onion in 1/4 inch  (or less) slices.... put one quarter of the onions on the bottom of a 2 qt to 2 1/2 quart container (one with lid preferably).

Then layer 1/2 of the beats, next another layer of 1/4 of the sliced onions... then place 8 to 12 eggs. Then another  1/4 of the onions followed by the last half of 

the pickled beats and all of the juices, then top it off with the last of the onions. 

shake the container a bit to help everything settle.. sprinkle a little ground cloves on top. Next using half water and half vinegar fill the container until all the ingredients are under liquid. 

give it a day or two and you can start eating your pickled eggs. 

 

Notes:

We can our own pickled beats and use cloves as part of the process so we dont add more at this stage of the game.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Scott. I bet the pickled beets and onions are delicious with the pickled eggs! Your recipe sounds very sour, though. What kind of vinegar do you use? That will make a big difference.

 

I never got around to making the mustard and dill eggs. I should do that soon-- after all, I already bought all the ingredients. I was disappointed in my second batch of pickled eggs, though. The first batch was as I described-- vinegar with mixed pickling spices. They were delicious. Then I got cute and decided to re-use the pickling brine; I just added more eggs. Batch #1 eggs turned a tan color and were very flavorful, but batch #2 with the re-used brine the eggs were barely colored at all and not very flavorful. It turns out that the first batch of eggs ABSORBED the spices so the brine was depleted. Who knew??!!  :o

 

Oh, well, I'll have to try the mustard and dill ones now. See how that goes. Then maybe Scotts beet and onion eggs. Oh joy!!  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Scott. I bet the pickled beets and onions are delicious with the pickled eggs! Your recipe sounds very sour, though. What kind of vinegar do you use? That will make a big difference.....

Not sour... it is almost sweet... you only add a little vinegar and water at the end so all the solid ingredients are under liquid...

The rest just takes care of itself.. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vinegar, straight up - Sarge doesn't dilute it - one onion, 6 or 8 garlic cloves, pinch of dried cayenne pepper, and a packet of Zesty Italian spices - the dried stuff you make your own salad dressing with.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

About us

QuitTrain®, a quit smoking support community, was created by former smokers who have a deep desire to help people quit smoking and to help keep those quits intact.  This place should be a safe haven to escape the daily grind and focus on protecting our quits.  We don't believe that there is a "one size fits all" approach when it comes to quitting smoking.  Each of us has our own unique set of circumstances which contributes to how we go about quitting and more importantly, how we keep our quits.

Get in touch

Follow us

×

Important Information

Guidelines