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I am never putting any nicotine or tobaccoo in my body ever again. Ever. 

120 hours clean. It feels amazing. I am never smoking ever again. 

Still foggy headed and a bit detached. A lot of anxiety earlier. Its ok though. I get to wake up in my own house tomorrow for the first time as an ex smoker. 

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And you won't smell like that awful cigarette. 

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Keep going. You can do it.

They offer you nothing. They take away your money, health and your time. They do nothing for you.

 

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We have our freedom back

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10 hours ago, Berkshiredrifter said:

I am never putting any nicotine or tobaccoo in my body ever again. Ever. 

120 hours clean. It feels amazing. I am never smoking ever again. 

Still foggy headed and a bit detached. A lot of anxiety earlier. Its ok though. I get to wake up in my own house tomorrow for the first time as an ex smoker. 

 

Hello again Jon:

 

On the still feeling foggy headed, check out the video on the resources page http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/going-back-to-normal-after-quitting/.

There is a section in that video about how you may need to adjust eating patterns after quitting if you are experiencing this as an ongoing reaction. Also, there are other resources on that page addressing concerns like other medications, caffeine and other blood sugar issues that you may need to keep an eye on.

 

Also, some anxiety may be related to going back to more regular routines. Check out the page http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/how-quitting-smoking-is-like-learning-to-ride-a-bicycle/

 

Over all though, most people find themselves becoming calmer over time--calmer than when they were smoking. The page http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/quitting-smoking-can-make-you-calmer-happier-and-healthier/ addresses this issue.

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5 hours ago, Joel Spitzer said:

Over all though, most people find themselves becoming calmer over time--calmer than when they were smoking. 

 

Quite possibly the most persistent and ubiquitous myth held dear by nicotine addicts: smoking calms me down.

 

While in reality, living the overwhelming majority of your life in varying states of nicotine withdrawal is only adding to whatever stresses you have in your life.  The good news is: you can erase nicotine withdrawal from your life completely by no longer administering nicotine into your system.  Once you've managed the initial phase of your quit, you can go on about your life free of withdrawal and the constant need to feed the beast.

 

The only people doomed to living with nicotine withdrawal the rest of their lives are those who continue smoking.

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If Im not too tired from work I believe I am at 148 hours clean. Quite a few cravings today, cue induced. They are getting weaker if not fewer or shorter. 

I am going to get some extra rest tomorrow and I think I'm going to drop caffeine completely for a while. Maybe that will help my brain chemistry to go back to normal. Im still foggy headed. I still have a slightly detached from reality feeling. 

I also have more oxygen.

Never using nicotine or tobacco ever again. Not one puff ever. 

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Berk, you are doing great.

One thing I was not prepared for though so hopefully others can be is this -

At some point (three months for me) cravings come back and hit real hard. When that day (or days) does come, do NOT give in. I almost did myself but would now be back at square one.

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My previous two quits have ended under identical circumstances at the 90 day mark. Seems to be a "thing" in nicotine recovery. 

Failure is a rehearsal for success. 

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1 hour ago, Berkshiredrifter said:

If Im not too tired from work I believe I am at 148 hours clean. Quite a few cravings today, cue induced. They are getting weaker if not fewer or shorter. 

I am going to get some extra rest tomorrow and I think I'm going to drop caffeine completely for a while. Maybe that will help my brain chemistry to go back to normal. Im still foggy headed. I still have a slightly detached from reality feeling. 

I also have more oxygen.

Never using nicotine or tobacco ever again. Not one puff ever. 

 

 I’m a huge coffee lover. One thing I thought I would never cut back on, but I have had to. Later in the day is when it hits me. I’ve cut back about half of my normal daily intake. It seems to be making me nervous. Cutting back helps.

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2 hours ago, Berkshiredrifter said:

My previous two quits have ended under identical circumstances at the 90 day mark. Seems to be a "thing" in nicotine recovery. 

Failure is a rehearsal for success. 

 

The 90 day thoughts are likely more due to environmental and routine changes tied to seasons than from any real change in physical demand for nicotine. Here are a few resource pages addressing this:

 

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/predestined-bad-days-after-quitting-2/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/thoughts-for-cigarettes-that-may-seem-worse-than-when-first-quitting-smoking/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/craves-and-thoughts-that-occur-over-time/

 

All of these pages have lots of links at the bottom addressing issues that may cause intensified thoughts for cigarettes. I must point out though--not all former smokers experience these reactions or if they do, they may be very minor. Don't want recent quitters or even people who are just now thinking of quitting to be intimidated by a concept of a tough time months or years into a quit that may not actually happen to them. 

 

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4 hours ago, Berkshiredrifter said:

If Im not too tired from work I believe I am at 148 hours clean. Quite a few cravings today, cue induced. They are getting weaker if not fewer or shorter. 

I am going to get some extra rest tomorrow and I think I'm going to drop caffeine completely for a while. Maybe that will help my brain chemistry to go back to normal. Im still foggy headed. I still have a slightly detached from reality feeling. 

I also have more oxygen.

Never using nicotine or tobacco ever again. Not one puff ever. 

 

Here is a resource page I have addressing caffeine issues. 

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/possible-changes-in-caffeine-tolerance/

 

One thing I need to point out is that I remember having a number of clinic participants who at some point in time after quitting, or even at times during the clinic also abruptly stopped consuming caffeine. They often seemed to have some foggy and dragging kind of reactions that actually seemed to last a little longer than the withdrawal phase they experienced when quitting nicotine. You need to listen to your body on this one.

 

Also, if the fogginess doesn't start to improve past the 72 hour mark from getting off of nicotine, you need to be considering other issues that may be involved. Eating patterns may be an issue needing to be addressed. Also, if you are on any medications there may be issues. Here are some resources addressing these issues:

 

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/going-back-to-normal-after-quitting/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/will-this-get-better/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/medication-adjustments-that-may-be-necessary-after-quitting-smoking/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/when-you-may-really-need-to-talk-to-your-doctor-about-quitting-smoking/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/does-nicotine-withdrawal-really-last-for-months-or-years/

http://whyquit.com/joels-videos/is-this-a-symptom-of-quitting-smoking-part-2/

Edited by Joel Spitzer
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