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Where may I sit on the train?


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Day 1 again. I soaked the rest of the pack. I have patches here if I feel I want to go that route again and 

I also have 2 mg nic. gum if I feel I want to go that route. But ultimately I would really like to do this cold

turkey as that is one thing I have never attempted. So I have a plan in place here, 

I am referring to my addiction as the demon inside me,  and only I can kill it, one day, one hour, one minute at a time.

 

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Congrats on climbing back on board, Karen...

 

Once you make up your mind that you HAVE quit...starting now....that's the first step...then , like you said, break it down into a do-able time frame and quit for that moment...the cravings start strong, but each time you get through one, you are stronger, and they are weaker....

 

Head down and move forward....

 

Today is the first day of the rest of your life!

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So happy for you, Karen!  Not One Puff Ever!  Withdrawal can be uncomfortable, miserable, even...but it will not kill you.  You can get through it...one moment at a time!  Make the daily pledge, and just get through that day.  

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Sit anydamnedwhere you please, or stand if you like ... but know ... *know* that there is no "demon". Deflecting blame to imaginary entities is not a path to success.

 

There is you. Only you.

 

You.

 

You choose to smoke. Not some mythical demon, right?

 

BTW you don't need any of the other crap, either. It only serves to distract and keep the taste of the drug going. You don't need it.

 

 

 

 

Easy Pesy.

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So pleased to see you get right back on Karen! You really have got this. As ever the Sgt is controversial but his advice always rings true for me. It really is just you making those choices and I believe eventually every quitter gets there, to that conclusion. Eventually to really conquer smoking, to be free, we let go. We stop fighting and screaming and struggling against ourselves and realise we were doing that to ourselves.

 

However, from being here and watching others tell their tale I realise that everybody gets there in their own time. I've seen Evelyn who battled with so much more than just nicotine yet continues demonstrating such strength and bravery and Doreen who literally left it to the last second. Then there's easier quits with Boo who seems to have just 'got it' so quickly. We all have our tales to tell and own experiences but the one thing which appears to be consistent with us all is 'Never take another puff'. Just today, right now, you don't smoke. The rest will follow.

 

So sit down, get comfy and enjoy the ride. If you can embrace it, relax and tell yourself there is no fight - You just choose not to smoke, I promise it will be easier on yourself. If you want to throw a tantrum, stamp your feet and cry in the shower, I am assured this can also be an effective quitting method.

 

My final word, NRT is used by so many but again, it only takes 3 days to get rid of the nicotine and nicotine withdrawal itself doesn't hurt. At all. It feels a bit icky and you feel a little 'uncomfortable'. But you have felt exactly the same every 20 minutes for the whole of your smoking career, every time the last cig wears off. So, my penny's worth is quit the nicotine now while you have the strength and motivation. The victory is all in your mind anyway.

 

Well done for getting back on. You got this.

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Any seat in the no smoking section is a good seat.  

 

A cold turkey quit is nothing to fear.  There are no dosage and timing concerns.  You don't have to worry about running out of anything related to your quit.  And, it is free.  You just quit feeding yourself nicotine and in three-days, the nicotine is out of your system and you can focus solely on the mental aspects of your addiction.  Simplicity is a great thing.

 

Commit to the process.  With each NOPE you start to pave new pathways in your mind and eventually not smoking becomes your new normal.  The benefits just keep rolling in.

 

Best wishes Karen.

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Karen, good for you.  You can sit next to me on the train. I used to think about a little nicodemon living inside and I would picture it raging and pitching a fit. I knew if I did not feed it, it would go away.  I imagined it growing weaker each day.  The craves are not you.  You are a higher, rational being who can resist and separate herself from the urge to smoke always. You are in control.

 

 

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Thanks all for the good advice, once again. This has been the longest day of my frickin life and I am totally exhausted. I did however use two pieces of nic gum. This afternoon I felt so confused and disoriented that I didn't know what else to do. I did not smoke though, and tomorrow is a new day, and I am going to just give in and surrender and not fight the natural process inside me of withdrawal.

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You can do this girl!!! That demon you refer to is caled addiction ;) you can starve it which you are doing right now :) pray if it helps but YOU are responsible, always!

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Hi Karen,

 

I had to separate things for it to make sense.  I am a whatever works kind of quitter. 

 

The most powerful tool you have is to choose, daily, to not be a smoker. Don't think too big or too far, there's time enough for that later. The way to quit is simply to not smoke the next time the addiction tries to urge you to do it. Each battle is unique and each win gives the next thought less of a chance. 

 

Fingers crossed you got first class seating :) xx

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Thanks all for the good advice, once again. This has been the longest day of my frickin life and I am totally exhausted. I did however use two pieces of nic gum. This afternoon I felt so confused and disoriented that I didn't know what else to do. I did not smoke though, and tomorrow is a new day, and I am going to just give in and surrender and not fight the natural process inside me of withdrawal.

How is it going today, Karen?

 

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I suggest a seat in car #12 as it is the official coffee house.  The coffee is always fresh...and free.  Don't let Ava try and charge you for it because she pockets the money for books.

 

There is nothing that can stop you from quitting except yourself.  I understand why people use the term "nicodemon" and assign it other names, but truly, it's just a weed that contains a substance that is highly addictive, toxic and deadly.  You quit by never taking another puff, ever.  By assigning it some outside force you give it a power that it doesn't have which also could turn into an excuse to smoke.  In doing so, we don't hold ourselves 100% accountable for our actions because there's this "other thing" that is really evil.  Doesn't exist.  It's just you and some dried up leaves soaked with thousands of chemicals that you're addicted to.

 

We're all nicotine addicts.  Nothing more, nothing less.  We made the choice to smoke and we can also make the choice to never light up again.  If we all could do you, you certainly can as well because I know for a fact, nicodemon and monsters don't exist.

 

Proud of you!  Welcome back.  :)

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Maryland quitter you said it so much more eloquently than Sarge, although I realize Sarge has only the best of intentions so says it like it is. Today is better I suppose but very strange mentally. I FORGOT to go to work. For real, which is not good. I am still so confused and disoriented and soooo exhausted although I slept well.. I really am wondering what role nicotine plays in the brain of someone with bipolar disorder and when the supply of nicotine is cut off cold turkey???

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 I really am wondering what role nicotine plays in the brain of someone with bipolar disorder and when the supply of nicotine is cut off cold turkey???

 

Karen, if you are currently working with a medical professional you should consult with them.  Your question sparked my curiosity and I attempted a bit of research.  I couldn't find much in the way of serious research into the relationship between nicotine addiction and bipolar disorder.  The few scholarly articles I found reached open-ended conclusions and the internet being the internet, there were a few sources that took a bit of anecdotal evidence and treated it like holy writ.

 

People with bipolar disorder have successfully quit smoking, but BD does present unique challenges in the process.  Whether you decide to stick with cold turkey or try another route, the important thing is to get yourself in a place where you can break the hold nicotine addiction has on you.

 

Hang tough Karen.  Everything worth doing presents a challenge.

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Karen

 

I am by no means a medical professional and I would advise you seek advice. However, observationally I have noticed from the posts of many others that those with depression/anxiety disorders definitely seem to struggle and have more craves than those who don't. Whether this is due to the effects nicotine had on dopamine levels which are already disrupted by the mental health disorder, I am in no position to say but it is definitely interesting.

 

I cannot advise you on the best way to quit, particularly as I haven't experienced bipolar firsthand but I can offer you encouragement. There are lots of people in these forums that have quit even though they have depressive disorders and I believe that you can do it too. You may have it harder than some but I believe that using the support here, you can quit too. Make a promise to utilise the SOS thread. Ask for help BEFORE you consider smoking and I think the people here may just talk you down again.

 

As for coping with the day to day, keep taking small steps forward. It will get better and you can do this.

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Karen,

 

I don't suffer with BP but I do suffer with PTSD. My experience was around 6-8 week I had the worst anxiety which had me running to my GP fast, I don't mind admitting it.

 

I hadn't been on meds for years but when I stop smoking, it was like a mask lifted from me and all of a sudden I was exposed.

 

Go and see your GP Karen, even if it is only for a chat. Let him know that your are quitting, so that if you sink in that black cloud he will be keeping an eye on you.

 

I will tell you my secret of how I got through. Post, no matter what. It doesn't matter how often and weather you are moaning all the time.

 

There is three reason why posting works.

1)You have let out what you are feeling, that is always good. No one will judge you here.

2)You haven't acted on impulse, it gives you time to think properly.

3) The support you will get is immense, as you well know already.

 

You can do this Karen. Just cling on and we will carry you through.

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I was doing pretty good other than being very confused and borderline disoriented yesterday. I just read your replies to the nicotine/bipolar issue I am wondering about. I believe for ME nic gum or patch is the best method. I'm going to set a new quit date in the very near future AFTER I talk to my phsychiatrist who I 've worked with for many years. I smoked a cig last night, so I caved once again. If anyone dare imply that I am just using this (bp) as an excuse....I will answer you in the room where I can swear.

I am also a recovering alcoholic/drug addict. When I hit rock bottom in 1986 I checked myself in for 30 days treatment and followed up with aftercare and many AA meetings. So am very aware of the laws of addiction.

I cannot even count how many times I have attempted to quit smoking ....But I do find this addiction to be more difficult to quit and STAY quit for the long run than the others.

I am truly sorry and immensely regret not reaching out and posting an SOS last night, for that there is no excuse. I didn't even give you guys a chance.:(

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Thanks Nancy I do plan on sticking around and reading a lot more here....for now I'm using nic. gum.

There just HAS to be somewhere on the web credible info on how nicotine interacts with antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

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There just HAS to be somewhere on the web credible info on how nicotine interacts with antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

 

There is plenty of credible information on the subject, but very little in the way of conclusive answers.  It's understandable.  The combination of nicotine addiction, depressive disorders, prescription medications, and all of the balancing and counterbalancing agents in our brains makes for a lot of moving parts in the equation.  The questions are infinite.  The answers are finite.

 

In working with your psychiatrist, I believe you will eventually find your path to freedom.  It may take a little trial-and-error experimentation, but eventually you will discover what works for you.

 

The perfect quit is the quit that fits you perfectly. 

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