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Doreensfree

Hi Newbies .Sitting on the Train !!!!

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How ya,all doing .( My USA ).....

Come and tell us .. how you feeling.....notice  any changes ..?????

What you doing with all that time now your fabulous non smokers....

You saving your dollars ?????

We are so happy to have you here ....

Except in the counting game ..( Mac ).....

 

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I had a lot of questions about my quit symptoms the first month of my quit and was glad I had people who had been through those things already to guide me and tell me it was normal.

Shout out you guys with any questions you have regarding your quits. We're here for you 😊

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When I first quit I was looking for some like people who have also quit or are quitting. I found all the support I could ever need right here on the train. So, for all you newbies welcome. Purchase your ticket, board the train and soak in all the knowledge and support that you will ever need. Oh yeah, don't let Doreen scare you with that frying pan talk.

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Where are all of the newbies?  Seems like they're here for a short while and then disappear or they just show up sporadically to post something in Celebrations to get some kudos.

 

I feel pretty good except for a bit of foggy head.  I'm sure that I now have some extra time but I'm not aware of it...lol...the days still fly by like nothing.  I'm very happy about the saved $$$.  After trying so many times, I'm just relieved that I finally quit.

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You're almost out of the foggy brain stage Mona so hang in there, you're doing great! 😊

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8 minutes ago, jillar said:

You're almost out of the foggy brain stage Mona so hang in there, you're doing great! 😊

 

Hope so but if not, I'm just being extra cautious when I drive or do things that could be dangerous.

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The foggy brain issues will eventually clear up because of your commitment to being smoke free. You got more of handle on your quit than you give yourself credit for. Stay with it Mona.

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Posted (edited)

I just finished day 12 of this quit! I've been getting by. I've been on this site at least twice a day, everyday. I read the recent posts and some of the older ones. I've also been watching the Big Tobacco videos. I don't post much now because not much has changed. I can't see complaining all the time when I know what it is I have to do. So far I'm doing it. Everyday is pretty much the same now. I fight the cravings as they come. Some are easier to get past then others, but I manage. I've said before that I don't believe there is such a thing as a craving that can't be beat. I still believe that.

I will admit that continued fighting with those cravings can wear me down over time. I lost my last quit, of 20 days, earlier this month because I was just plain worn out, physically and mentally. Each one of the fights to stay quit adds up over time. I just got tired. No excuses, I didn't have the resolve it took to succeed. I wasn't even having a craving  when I lit back up. It's hard to explain!

 

Well this is a new quit. I'm trying to think differently about how to handle it. I'm trying to think about the whole process in a more positive way. The people, along with the materials on this forum, can be credited for that.

I am drinking too much caffeine right now and I know it. I've watched Joel's video about cutting your caffeine intake in half when quitting smoking. It's in my quit plan. I was sticking to it. I had cut it exactly in half. But I've noticed that the amount I'm drinking each day is slowly creeping back up. I just feel like I need it for energy. I'm going to try and get the amount back down again. I'm just tired, and the caffeine gives me a little boost. I have been able to keep my sugar levels up, so I know the tiredness is not coming from that.

Thanks for asking!

  

Edited by JH63
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I know it's a lot of work and it takes a toll on you both mentally and physically. The end game here and your commitment to the bigger and healthier picture is all you need to be focusing on. Do not give into the junkie mentality. You are stronger then that. Make smart choices and always remember NOPE.

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Mac....

 

You my friend have  a good solid quit ....even though your a newbie too....you support all the other travellers .

Your gonna make it to Freedom .....don't prove me wrong !!!!!.....and make me use my frying pan ...

Mona...

 

Your doing great this time around ....I'm proud of you .....all the tiredness and restless stuff your feeling ..

Will slowly fade away the longer to keep on track..my sleep was disturbed for a while ...but I was told it was temporary and it was ...I was soon back to sleeping normal ,if not better....upwards in onwards ..

JH63.

 

When I watched those 3 Tabacco Documentaries....it was a light bulb moment for me ...how could I have been so blind for over 5 decades...I promised not to give them any penny of my hard earned money ...

Some folks go through what's been called ..No Man's Land ...it's when the newness of your quit has faded ,and your just plodding along ...and some can lose thier quits....Thankfully I was always excited about mine ...

That's why sticking around here and posting , joining in ..can be important....

It helps through the tough times ...

Stay strong ....the Benefits are so worth the fight ...

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@Mona,  I am so glad you are not lighting up.  Your attitude is great.

The patches continue to feed your addiction and prolong your 'fog'.  This won't end until you are done with the patches and possibly for some time afterwards.

Just something to be aware of and the downside to NRT's.  They lengthen the healing process.

 

@Mac#23

You blaze the trail for others every day.  You're attitude is so great and your exuberance, contagious.

 

@JH63,  your posts are a catalyst for getting the information out there.  I am so glad you are taking advantage and learning all you can.

This quit of yours is growing leaps and bounds.   

 

I know there are lots of lurkers...I love lurkers.  I was a lurker, quit and 10 months later joined to thank all these people.  Stayed for the education and the laughs.

It is a great community we have here.  

All of our newbies make it great.  The energy, so beautiful.  The power being re-claimed.  The self-confidence emerging like wildfire.

 

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Hey @JH63, the continued fight wore me down too but I knew the only way past it was to go through it. Once you do that you'll never have to go through it again. I used my misery as an incentive to stay quit. I knew I didn't want to do that again!

And as far as complaining goes, sometimes it's just the best medicine. Get it off your chest and feel a little better. 😊

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6 hours ago, Sazerac said:

@Mona,  I am so glad you are not lighting up.  Your attitude is great.

The patches continue to feed your addiction and prolong your 'fog'.  This won't end until you are done with the patches and possibly for some time afterwards.

Just something to be aware of and the downside to NRT's.  They lengthen the healing process.

 

 

@Sazerac, I didn't get the fogginess until several days after I stepped down so I'm pretty sure it is a withdrawal symptom.  I will be further stepping down mid next week so it quite possibly will get worse.  Might pick up another symptom or two also?  Hope not but it is what it is.  I'll get through it as I feel that there is no turning back now.  I am a non-smoker albeit a nic'ed up one.

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@JH63, keep on learning about this hideous addiction.  It will forever sour you on smoking!

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Hey Mona,

You can handle this and persevere through all the pitfalls that come with it. I know in my heart that you are a non-smoker as am I. We shall beat this nicotine monster with all the wonderful support we receive on the Quit Train.

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3 hours ago, Mona said:

 

@Sazerac, I didn't get the fogginess until several days after I stepped down so I'm pretty sure it is a withdrawal symptom.  I will be further stepping down mid next week so it quite possibly will get worse.  Might pick up another symptom or two also?  Hope not but it is what it is.  I'll get through it as I feel that there is no turning back now.  I am a non-smoker albeit a nic'ed up one.

 

You are correct, the fogginess is a withdrawal symptom.  Some people don't experience this although,  I certainly did. 

 

As far as other symptoms, keep an open mind, you quit smoking and whatever discomfort you may feel, it is only temporary and you don't smoke !

 

I love your attitude, 'it is what it is', you are right

 

and your statement,

"I'll get through it as I feel there is no turning back"

is the way forward. 

You are headed towards your freedom and it will be yours FOREVER to nurture and protect.

 

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 Hi People!

                 

20 hours ago, Doreensfree said:
20 hours ago, Doreensfree said:

Some folks go through what's been called ..No Man's Land ...it's when the newness of your quit has faded ,and your just plodding along ...and some can lose their quits....Thankfully I was always excited about mine ...

 

                This statement caught my eye. It feels like this is where I'm at. " No Man's land"  Right now each day is basically the same. I wake up fighting the cravings and I go to bed fighting the cravings. Sleep and the small lengths of time between the cravings are my only break from the fight. I'm just trudging along each day. I'm glad that you were excited about your quit.

 

              It seems to be a pattern with me; I start off very positive, then after the first few days or a week I start to fade. I become somewhat lethargic the longer I fight to stay quit. This quitting process has rules, but the one I hate the most is that everyone's quit is different. There is no way of knowing when I will feel any better. That's the No Man's Land I'm talking about. I can do this, but to be honest, I never know how long I can do it. I just pray everyday that things will get better soon!  

 

             I just finished day 13 and I'll make it through day 14. I'll worry about 15 when it gets here!

    Take Care!

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Found this from the back of the cupboard...

 

By tahoehal  on May 13 2008 at 5:54 pm 

77, Male
Las Vegas
NV, United States 
Member Since: September 01 2004

« Previous Entry  Next Entry » 
 

I seldom start a post, unless it is to honor someone's anniversary. But I feel compelled to share something that I seem to be sharing a lot of lately... and that is my thoughts on 'No Man's Land'. No Man's Land is a dangerous and scary place... and it is a lonely time during a quit.

I call No Man's Land that period of time between about 1 month and 3 or 4 months into your quit, or about the time from the end of your first month.. This is a time when many people slip and go into a full relapse and have to start over... if they can start over, that is. I have some observations that may help some of you who are literally hanging on by your fingernails... or who may find yourself there tomorrow.

The first month is an exhausting but exhilirating experience... you are locked in nearly daily struggles and you get the satisfaction of successfully beating your addiction that day. You go to bed a WINNER each night (as Troutnut would say), and you are justifiably proud of yourself. Your friends and family are also supportive as they see you struggling each day to maintain your quit. And you are being constantly supported here, whether or not you post... just being here is good for your quit. And so, the battles are won and it actually becomes easier and the battles occur less often as you finish 30 days or so.

Around 60 days, you're starting to have some really good days, with very few craves and some nice insights about yourself... but then again, you still have some bad days. Those bad days can really be depressing... you begin to wonder if you're ever gonna be able to relax. Your junkie is whispering to you, telling you that 'just one' won't hurt. You've conquered your daily triggers, but now you start trippiing over the occasional ones... a death in the family, unexpectedly bad news, money problems, health problems, going on a long car ride, a trip to the bar, or whatever. You have a strong crave and you begin to doubt your ability to keep your quit. 

In addition, the 3D support that you used to get is pretty much gone... non-smokers figure you should be 'over it' by now, smokers don't like to hang around you much because they feel guilty and addicted (remember that feeling?), and people who have quit may not remember just how much love and support you need well into the first few months. They all think you should be 'over it', you think you should be 'over it'... and the temptation is to have 'just one' to see if you ARE over it.

But of course you're not over it, are you? That 'just one' whisper becomes much much louder and becomes 'just one more'... and each time you give in to that whisper, the craves come harder and sooner. The one way to guarantee that your craves will never go away is to light up, to slide that old cigarette needle into your arm and shoot up. Those craves will be back and keep coming back. But if you protect your quit, your craves will eventually weaken and become even fewer and farther between.

As you get to around 100 days or so (some will be a bit longer)... you will begin to really get a healthy perspective on your addiction. You will see the huge role that smoking played in your life, you will see clearly what that addiction really cost you. And you will understand that it was a very high price to pay... the loss of your confidence, your emotions, your self-control... your SELF. All enslaved to your addiction.

And you will begin to see that you can look forward to a non-smoking future without romanticizing your addiction. You see it clearly for the life-stealing evil it was... and is. You see a much different future for yourself than your past has been. And it no longer scares the crap out of you to think that you are done smoking... in fact, you embrace that thought with joy every day.

But you have to get out of No Man's Land first. How can you help yourself? And how can those of us who have been through it help you?

First of all, you need to understand that you aren't alone. If you haven't already done so, make a pinky-finger promise with 2 or 3 good quitbuds and exchange phone numbers with them. Promise to call them if you're ever in trouble, and make them promise the same. These are your 'life and death' quitbuddies... you are literally trusting each other with your lives. Then call them... often. Just to see how they are doing, and to tell them you're doing well too. Be totally honest with them, this is life and death.

Second, understand that you're going to have some unexpectedly bad days... but they are going to be further apart. Shrug them off, laugh your way through them, call your quitbuddies... whatever it takes to get through them without smoking. Some battles will be easy, some will be hard. Come here and post, send qmail, exercise, learn to cook, take up a new hobby. Whatever it takes, keep going to bed a WINNER each night.

Third, ask some of the older qsters to keep an eye on you... to contact you to see how you're doing. I have been asked to do that for several of you recently and I am happy to do that, as I am sure that others are too. We know that you just need to hold on a little bit longer and change your focus just a little to make that breakthrough. And then you will OWN your quit, and it will be a very comfortable thing.

Last, take a deep and honest look at your past life... your life as a smoker and compare it to what your life is like now... and what it will be like in the future. You have to develop that vision of your future, of the person that you are going to BECOME now that you have freed yourself. You have to believe in yourself. You have to love yourself enough to deny yourself your addiction.

No Man's Land doesn't have to be so lonely and scary and dangerous. You need some company and some courage and some faith in yourself. And when you emerge from it, you will not be the same person that entered it.

Never never never question your decision to quit! This is the most loving thing that you will ever do for yourself. A few days of discomfort in exchange for a lifetime of freedom. You will never find another deal like it.

Protect your quit. Don't smoke, no matter what.

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4 hours ago, JH63 said:

 Hi People!

                 

                This statement caught my eye. It feels like this is where I'm at. " No Man's land"  Right now each day is basically the same. I wake up fighting the cravings and I go to bed fighting the cravings. Sleep and the small lengths of time between the cravings are my only break from the fight. I'm just trudging along each day. I'm glad that you were excited about your quit.

 

              It seems to be a pattern with me; I start off very positive, then after the first few days or a week I start to fade. I become somewhat lethargic the longer I fight to stay quit. This quitting process has rules, but the one I hate the most is that everyone's quit is different. There is no way of knowing when I will feel any better. That's the No Man's Land I'm talking about. I can do this, but to be honest, I never know how long I can do it. I just pray everyday that things will get better soon!  

 

             I just finished day 13 and I'll make it through day 14. I'll worry about 15 when it gets here!

    Take Care!

Instead of assuming this quit will be like others you have tried, focus daily on changing your thinking to start looking at the positive things that have happened since you have quit. What things? Saved money, better taste and better sense of smell. You no longer smell like a stale ashtray to others. You no longer have to worry if you have enough smokes to last the day ...... There's all kinds of good things happening already in your "smoke free life"! Sure the early days are tough. You're changing the entire way you lived that daily life for years but you will not only get used to that, you will begin to love your new smoke free life more and more. The process is hard at first but it won't kill you. Going back to the smokes just might! You have the ability to focus your thoughts on whatever you want to ..... the challenges or the positives of quitting. Try the positive side. It will serve you better :) 

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HI!

    @reciprocity I understand what you are saying and you are correct. Everything in life goes better when we think positive. I'm just having a problem getting there right now!

Take Care!

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Reading online this morning about the complexities of my new hobby. I'm craving nicotine and the thought that, "I want a cigarette" came to mind. Then I re-centered myself by thinking of how much money I'd have had for my new hobby if I hadn't spent so much money on my last hobby --smoking.

 

My new hobby is stock investing. I'm learning about stocks and company valuations from Buffet Books, free online tutorials. Also reading Seeking Alpha, Motley Fool, and others. Having the extra dollars to invest is a great weight on the side of the teeter totter of non-smoking vs smoking. Keeps non-smoking behavior grounded.

 

I'm a bit annoyed that I keep having to tick off the reasons I'm staying a nonsmoker. Will welcome the future days when it isn't an effort to stay nicotine-free.

But very grateful to have finally crossed over three months. Funny, I remember hitting one-month; don't remember when I'd crossed over two months. It's as though I skipped two and jumped straight to three.

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QuitTrain®, a quit smoking support community, was created by former smokers who have a deep desire to help people quit smoking and to help keep those quits intact.  This place should be a safe haven to escape the daily grind and focus on protecting our quits.  We don't believe that there is a "one size fits all" approach when it comes to quitting smoking.  Each of us has our own unique set of circumstances which contributes to how we go about quitting and more importantly, how we keep our quits.

 

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