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JH63

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A lot of what you are experiencing and going through is normal, Jeff.  Just keep taking it one day at a time, continue to read helpful posts and sharing with us what you are going through.

 

Keep up the great work.  You are doing awesome.

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17 hours ago, JH63 said:

But I can already feel some depression creeping into my mind. In order to stay quit I have to concentrate on it almost all the time I'm awake. I think the depression comes along when I get mentally tired of concentrating on staying quit.

 

I thought about cigarettes and smoking constantly in the early days of my quit.  The obsessive thoughts diminished with time.  Eventually those thoughts vanished completely.

 

I had serious doubts about whether I could quit permanently.  Now I can't even imagine smoking another cigarette.

 

Quitting is a process.  You are still in the baptism by fire stage right now...it gets better with time.

 

Hang in there Jeff.  You are going in the right direction.

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I don't remember what was worse, the constant thoughts of cigarettes or the insomnia. But what I do remember was the day when I realized hours had gone by and I HADN'T thought about smoking. I also remember the first morning after quitting when I woke up in the best mood I'd been in in years. It was like the fog was finally starting to clear. I even sang in the shower lol.

You'll get there too Jeff as long as you stick to your awesome quit. And if the depression gets too bad then please call your Dr. A lot of times they can prescribe something, if only temporary, to help you with that.

You're doing great Jeff! 😊

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You People Are Awesome! Thanks for taking the time to give me guidance and encouragement. Maybe I will be able to help someone who is fighting this addiction, in the future.

Worked outside most of the day. The weather was great. We have had a cold/rainy spring here. This was only the second day I've had the the central air on this year.

Day six wasn't that bad. I had several urges and cravings, but was able to fight them off. My wife took a nap in the afternoon, while I watched all of Joel"s videos that have been suggested to me here. I had already watched some of them earlier in the week, but still had 10 or 12 to go. About an hour and a half! Tonight I read some more in the thread where past quitters talk about how they managed their urges and cravings in the early days of their quits. That helps me in more ways than one. I make notes of things I think might help me, and it reminds me of just how many other people have been right where I'm at now. That's a very long thread!

My sleep in messed-up. I sleep well, but I go to bed late and sleep in late. I don't care about that much. I think my system is just adjusting. My stomach is cramping some and I'm gassy. I've had that problem on other quits. It will pass, so to speak. I have also noticed a ringing in my ears. I've had that before, even when I was smoking.

I am having some of the normal junkie thinking from time to time. To maintain this quit I can't allow any bargaining with myself. I'll fool around make a bad bargain if I'm not careful! 

Take Care Everyone!

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Hey Jeff 

Keep strong and keep the faith. Reach down inside for the strength and power to banish the evil nicotine monster. I have something that might help you with keeping you focused on your quit. Make a list of all the reasons for and advantages of quitting smoking. Every morning read through your list to put your quit and your future into perspective. Anytime you feel a craving or feel you may stumble take the time and read your list again. Everyone needs a reminder now again of all the positive things we have to look forward too. You can do this. You just need a little faith in yourself. Always remember ........NOPE

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Your doing flippin marvelous Jeff....

My sleep pattern was all over the place too...but after a few weeks it settled down ,and was sleeping better after that ...

It all about rewiring your brain to another set of patterns ....

We have been stuck in addiction mode for years ...I remember going to my local shop one day ,not long after I quit ,and some stranger asked me ..Did I Have A Light ....I just said No I  Don't Smoke  before I even thought about it ..That was a great LightBulb moment for me ....and a proud one ..I can still remember that feeling ..

Upwards and onwards !!!

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5 hours ago, JH63 said:

Maybe I will be able to help someone who is fighting this addiction, in the future.

 

You are already helping people, Jeff.

The sharing of your reality serves to guide others and encourage smokers to quit and also can  resonate and strengthen someone's quit.

Please add to any existing thread with your experiences or start your own,

the more information and evidence of a successful quit are collected, the more effective we can be.

 

5 hours ago, Mac#23 said:

Make a list of all the reasons for and advantages of quitting smoking. Every morning read through your list to put your quit and your future into perspective.

 

This ^^^^ from Mac is an excellent recommendation.

 

You are building a fine quit, Jeff.  

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You can also make a list of all the great benefits of quitting that you've already noticed and keep adding to it as new ones come about :) You're doing great Jeff, your wife must be so proud of you already. :) 

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JH, you're doing awesome.  Many of us have gone through sleep and gas issues.  It doesn't last.  I used to snack till the kitchen was empty and then go looking for food at the neighbor's.  It's all good - you're not smoking!  Stay strong and stay alert.  This addiction will try to tell you things like - it's ok to celebrate with a cig now that you've gone xx days without one.  It's a sneak attack just when you start to feel good - stay alert for those.

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Every day you don't smoke is a day closer to being smoke free for life!

It WILL happen given time. Be patient and focus on the positives you notice each day (even the small ones)!

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I made it a week!

I'm happy about that. I had some urges and cravings on day seven, but I was able to deal with them. I'm happy about that also.

@Mac#23 I made a list like you are talking about back about two quits ago. I've got it right beside me on the end table and I put it in my wallet when I go out. I need to update it,  add some things, then make a second copy. It's falling apart from being folded up small enough to be put in my wallet. I read it often!

1 hour ago, d2e8b8 said:

 Stay strong and stay alert.  This addiction will try to tell you things like - it's ok to celebrate with a cig now that you've gone xx days without one.  It's a sneak attack just when you start to feel good - stay alert for those.

I agree with you! I've had a pretty smooth first week considering I know how that first week can be. Now I'm suspicious about when I will really be tested. I lost a quit years ago after over four months nicotine free. I lost a 20 day quit earlier this month, and many others at different lengths of time. So I'm waiting with my guard up. If I lose it this time it will be my fault, just as it was with all the others. I'm just thankful for today! All I have to do is get up tomorrow and not smoke for another day!

 Take Care My Friends!

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6 hours ago, JH63 said:

I made it a week!

. Now I'm suspicious about when I will really be tested. I lost a quit years ago after over four months nicotine free. I lost a 20 day quit earlier this month, and many others at different lengths of time. So I'm waiting with my guard up. If I lose it this time it will be my fault, just as it was with all the others.

 

Don't be borrowing trouble, Jeff.  You might not be tested.  NOPE may be etched on your brain now.

Still, maintain your vigilance, this must be done.

You will not fail unless you choose to fail.  So don't !  Protect your quit as you would a newborn.  

 

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Hey Jeff,

 Your quit is tested everyday and you will be enticed by the nicotine beast. So, don't be suspicious of your quit. If you do this it is only the subconscious effort of a junkie trying to rationalize a relapse. Take that thought process out of the equation. You need to fight for one day at a time. Slowly these days will add up to a strong, healthy and productive quit. Reach deep and fight for each day. We will be here for you along the way and remember the daily NOPE pledge.

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One day at a time Jeff....don't look ahead ..just cope with today ...

Our brains can be our worst enemy sometimes ...

Tomorrow and thereafter doesn't matter today ...

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Congrats on getting past Hell week Jeff! 😊

One thing that helped me not relapse (among others) was knowing that I could smoke if I wanted to I just choose not to. This gives me back the power of my quit. You will only relapse if you choose to relapse. And we're all getting on you to succeed in making this your forever quit 😊

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3 hours ago, jillar said:

One thing that helped me not relapse (among others) was knowing that I could smoke if I wanted to I just choose not to. This gives me back the power of my quit. You will only relapse if you choose to relapse. 

    This is one of the ways I quit drinking. I told myself that I could drink anytime I wanted. It took a load off me and allowed me to get through the process

easier. I've not drank  anything in a long time. I actually don't want a drink anymore. I also told myself, if I never drink again, I had already drank more than most people do in a lifetime. I was going to AA meetings twice a week and working the 12 step program. Then almost all at once, something clicked and I was over it. Quit July 4th, 2018 and have never looked back.

    I have tried to apply the same principles I learned in AA to quit smoking. There is something different about quitting smoking. To me it's much harder to quit smoking! I think it's because I smoked all day. I only drank late in the evening. Plus I still had the cigarettes when I quit drinking. I will try to think that way about smoking. Thanks!

    I had a bad day today, but I didn't smoke! On top of the normal cravings and urges I've been having, we had to have our cat put down. My wife woke me up early and told me that she was going to take the cat to the vet. I got a call about two hours later and they had put her to sleep for good. Her lungs kept filling up with fluid and her breathing would get very labored. That cat was a part of our household for around 15 years. My wife and youngest daughter were upset all day. I dug her a nice grave out on the hillside. It is amazing how attached we can become to pets. I will miss that cat, especially when I'm here by myself. She was good company! Then later in the day we went to two graveyards and put flowers on the graves of family members who have passed. We do that every Memorial Day! Just seemed like there was a lot of sadness around today. I will go to bed and hope tomorrow is better!

 Take Care!

   

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On Jeff, what a sad day for you. I'm so sorry about your cat. My pets are my kids so I know how hard it is when we have to put one down 😢 I'm just glad that you kept hold of that awesome quit you have going.

Here's to a better tomorrow.......

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Hey Jeff,

I'm sorry to hear about what you had to go through. That is a tough thing to go through emotionally and mentally. Something like that will test your resolve to remain smoke free. You weathered the storm and I'm proud of you. Way to stay strong and committed. Give my condolences to the family for their lost loved one. . Stay strong and you shall persevere.

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8 hours ago, JH63 said:

I told myself that I could drink anytime I wanted.

 

All we have is Choice.  to drink/not drink....smoke/not smoke.

Choosing LIFE and BREATH is the real narcotic.

 

Quitting Smoking Is An Option

 

One Day At A Time

 

8 hours ago, JH63 said:

I have tried to apply the same principles I learned in AA to quit smoking. There is something different about quitting smoking. To me it's much harder to quit smoking! I think it's because I smoked all day. I only drank late in the evening. Plus I still had the cigarettes when I quit drinking. I will try to think that way about smoking.

 

People In Recovery From Other Addictions

 

Is Quitting Smoking Harder Than Quitting Other Drugs ?

 

 

8 hours ago, JH63 said:

On top of the normal cravings and urges I've been having, we had to have our cat put down.

 

Sad and poignant Memorial Day for you and your family, Jeff.

 

This next video addresses the advantage of facing tough experiences early in your quit

 

I'll Quit When

 

You are doing great, Jeff.  Reward yourself for every crave you conquer, every trigger you face.

It is a pleasure to watch your metamorphosis.

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Aww bad day for sure ...I'm sorry ..

You stayed strong ...well done ....

Congratulations on conquering your Drink addiction ...shows you are a strong determined person 

You can do this too....I'm so proud of you .....as I'm sure your family is too...

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13 hours ago, JH63 said:

    This is one of the ways I quit drinking. I told myself that I could drink anytime I wanted. It took a load off me and allowed me to get through the process

easier. I've not drank  anything in a long time. I actually don't want a drink anymore. I also told myself, if I never drink again, I had already drank more than most people do in a lifetime. I was going to AA meetings twice a week and working the 12 step program. Then almost all at once, something clicked and I was over it. Quit July 4th, 2018 and have never looked back.

 

Many of the same rules apply in kicking an addiction regardless of the vice.  "Something clicked and I was over it."  That moment will happen for you in regards to cigarettes as well.  For me, it hit in a flash.  I started asking myself some questions and the answers were right there.  For others, it was more of a gradual process; simply realizing that they had gone for days without any serious cravings or really thinking about smoking at all.

 

We all had our moment and you will too.

 

13 hours ago, JH63 said:

  I had a bad day today, but I didn't smoke! On top of the normal cravings and urges I've been having, we had to have our cat put down. My wife woke me up early and told me that she was going to take the cat to the vet. I got a call about two hours later and they had put her to sleep for good. Her lungs kept filling up with fluid and her breathing would get very labored. That cat was a part of our household for around 15 years. My wife and youngest daughter were upset all day. I dug her a nice grave out on the hillside. It is amazing how attached we can become to pets. I will miss that cat, especially when I'm here by myself. She was good company! Then later in the day we went to two graveyards and put flowers on the graves of family members who have passed. We do that every Memorial Day! Just seemed like there was a lot of sadness around today. I will go to bed and hope tomorrow is better!

 Take Care!

 

Some days throw a lot more at you than others...better days are ahead.

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