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When you were still a smoker, how long, after you put a cigarette out, did it take for you to start jonesing for another?  For me, it was about 20-30 minutes.  What a crappy way to live life.  Always anxious about the next fix.

 

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20-30 minutes for me too. Unless I was going somewhere I knew I couldn't smoke, then I would be jonesing as soon as I put the last one out 😞

And yes, it's a terrible way to live!

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30 minutes ago, BKP said:

When you were still a smoker, how long, after you put a cigarette out, did it take for you to start jonesing for another?  For me, it was about 20-30 minutes.  What a crappy way to live life.  Always anxious about the next fix.

 

Thirty minutes was the maximum amount of time I could go between cigarettes without feeling that old familiar pang of withdrawal.  

 

Other times, I was ready to light up another smoke within five minutes of ashing out the last one.

 

When you ask: how much does the addict want, the answer is always "more."

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Thirty minutes for me too.  If I was agitated or upset, it could be one right after the other.  Then there always was having to have one if there was someone smoking on the t.v..  If we were at the movies, and someone in the movie was smokelng, I was jonesing that cigarette until we were out of the theater.  Since I did not smoke around my family, the minute I walked into my parents home.  Actually, I could keep mentioning the times.  I think I was jonesing even when I was smoking!!!!!!!

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Yes, 30 or so minutes usually. Towards the end of my smoking career.....at times, I lit up another before putting out the one I was smoking!!!! 😎

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On 12/7/2019 at 12:22 AM, BKP said:

When you were still a smoker, how long, after you put a cigarette out, did it take for you to start jonesing for another?  For me, it was about 20-30 minutes.  What a crappy way to live life.  Always anxious about the next fix.

 

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I smoked more or less when I wanted so never felt desperation until I quit. So for me the jonesing thing only kicked in as a non smoker. 

 

I like being a non smoker just waiting for my brain to catch up.

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Half an hour was usually when I would crave another one too.

 

I tried several times to cut down my smoking but it was usually a struggle after 30 to 45 minutes smoke free.  I'm glad I don't have to deal with that now.

Edited by johnny5
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Our friend, Joel Spitzer explains this so well.

 

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This half-life of nicotine levels in the brain is 20-30 minutes under normal conditions.

Under abnormal conditions it may be shorter or longer.

Stress makes it shorter--significantly shorter in fact thus increasing the bodies demand for cigarettes.

This helps explain why smokers smoke more under stress

and why when facing equivalent stresses as an ex-smoker, they will eventually be calmer than when smoking.

 

The first time experiencing a specific stress will be a trigger,

but after a time or two the association will be broken

and withdrawal will no longer be encountered during the stress.

The same stress will then in essence be less stressful for all practical purposes.

 

To never have to deal with stress induced withdrawal,

r even withdrawals experienced during non-stress times--just from going too long without smoking--

always remember that to end nicotine withdrawal forever simply entails knowing to never take another puff!

Joel

 

and this video, also.

Smoking Triggers

 

 

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I averaged 2.5 to 3 hrs. between cigarettes while at work.

At home about 90 minutes

On average I smoked about 10 cigarettes per day.

 

So glad I made it a point to never smoke in residence or vehicle, otherwise I probably would have smoked much more than I did.

 

Still an addict though

Rainy day, wait it out...still raining OK go stand in rain with my umbrella to smoke (addict)

Snowing, freezing cold....put on winter coat, stocking cap, and thin gloves I bought just to smoke (addict)

On a long road trip.   Stop every 2-3 hrs at a rest stop to smoke (depending on how far the next one would be)

Airplane...whew air travel is rough, my normal departure airport does not have a smoking lounge anywhere inside or outside the security perimeter, you have to go all the way outside.  And on an especially long (6+ hrs) flight I would chew a piece of nicorette (addict).   When landing rush outside to smoke, then come back in to get luggage.

 

 

Edited by Wayne045
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