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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/28/21 in all areas

  1. Hello, I managed to stay smoke-free for almost two days, but unfortunately smoked 3 ciggarettes today, as the brain fog became unbearable at work :(. I threw my pack, lighter and ashtray, and I am ready to jump on the Quit Train! My story: Smoked since I was 14, now I'm 23, and decided I should end this addiction for good. I'm happy to find this community and I am confident that I will manage to stay quit with the help and support provided by this forum, and hope that when the time comes I can help others quit as well. I will no longer smoke and punish myself everyday with this addiction!
    16 points
  2. Still around sometimes……
    15 points
  3. Woohoo, six years quit today!!! I couldn't have done it without all the support I received, especially my first year quit. I've been fortunate to be able to be here to pay it forward and have made great friendships with people all over the world and for that I feel so grateful
    15 points
  4. A New Month ... Who is still sitting on the Train .... Of course the Toad is still buckled up !!!!
    14 points
  5. 14 points
  6. Wouldn't miss old cobsie's anniversary month....especially when we all pretend to forget and he gets his blue tighty whities in a twist..
    14 points
  7. Day 13 here, day 2 with no nicotine gum. It took me a while, but I finally made it. There's really no withdrawl to speak of, just substituting regular gum and it works just fine. I'm really glad I quit this way, it worked well for me now the rest without nicotine at all is up to me. Luckily, I forgot to bring the nicotine gum to work with me a couple of times and I didn't smoke so I have no fear of relapsing at work anymore. This quit will be as long or short as I make it, glad to be back in the drivers seat. Thank you all for your support.
    14 points
  8. I’m a newcomer pinging in to say hello. I’ve been lurking on the site for a while, but I set up a profile today so that I could participate. Thanks for the experiences and the compassionate, nonjudgmental encouragement shared here. Reading the info and comments has helped me through some white-knuckle moments. My last smoke was 17 days ago. It was not a planned quit. I was having oral surgery, and at midnight the night before I learned that smoking through the post-op was a really bad idea. (As if all the other harms of smoking for the last 40 years were somehow a really good idea?! Yeah, go figure.) Anyway, I slammed into this quit bass ackwards… unprepared mentally, emotionally or physically. I didn’t have any tools to hand, and hadn’t thought through how to be intentional to set myself up to succeed. Just boom. But I’m trying hard to make it work. There’s more than just a dental emergency at play. I want this quit and the suffering it entails to count for something. I’ve been ambivalent about smoking for some time, have been living in denial about the consequences, and have let smoking control my life for too long. Cold turkey was not an option for me, personally. (Did that before, didn’t stick.) So I’m using the patch on a step-down system. I’m constantly fiddling with silly putty. Trying to stay busy. Doing a lot of wall pushups. Attempting to stay positive. Getting a grip on my triggers. Making lists of alternative things to do in those moments. Re-reading the science. Doing more wall push-ups. I’m struggling with feelings of despair and intense physical discomfort as my body adjusts to a lot less nicotine. But this week, on average, was a bit easier than the last. So maybe that’s progress? I think addiction likes to hide in the dark. It feeds on shame and distortions, and whispers false justifications to us. So I guess part of why I am joining this QT community is to fend off those shadows by reaching out for reinforcement, to try to fill my brain with something different. I need to banish that voice from the dark that says nicotine is my best friend (it’s not) and says that I can’t exist without my smokes (I can, and I have 17 days of evidence to prove it). Today I am grateful for having your voices in my head, instead. You are helping me to rewire. Thanks for listening and bearing witness in return. DenaliBlues
    14 points
  9. It certainly has been a long and winding road for me on this quitting journey. I am definitely in a much better place now...both physically and mentally. I still remember those early days of my quit and how I thought "Will I ever get to a place where I am not constantly fighting the craves?". It was so exhausting but I kept trudging forward, ever so slowly! I am still here to let you know you eventually will get to that place and it will be a source of immense pride!! I truly think I couldn't have done it without the online support of a site like QuitTrain or QSMB (my first support group which is no longer around). Thanks for acknowledging my 5 yr (!!!!!!!) milestone, Rozuki the Rockstar
    14 points
  10. After being in touch and supporting each other as quitters since the summer of 2013, I had the pleasure of stopping by and meeting Paul and his lovely wife, Janet! They were so kind and welcoming to Dennis, me, and my Mom. Hoping they will share the recipe for the wonderful ginger cookies!
    13 points
  11. This Wonderful Train has been going at full speed for 8 years today .... It would be impossible to count how many smokers have been on board and found Freedom ... Thank you a million times MQ....for designing and building this place .. I know ,without you and the folks here ,I wouldn't be free today ... 3 Cheers for the Engine Driver !!!!
    13 points
  12. I had my blood test and it came back normal. It's great news and really nails home the quitting smoking theme. For those just tuning in, I had a high white cell count and the doctor said to cut down on smoking and take another blood test in three months. So now I have proof that smoking was to blame for my abnormal blood test and as long as I don't smoke anymore I will probably not have to get a bone marrow biopsy. I am so fortunate that this was found in it's infancy stage when quitting smoking now can make all the difference.
    13 points
  13. The magic cigarette. I had to smoke one first thing in the morning because it woke me up. Also had to smoke one right before bed so I could get some sleep. I had to smoke when I needed to focus on something. Also had to smoke when I just needed to clear my head and zone out for a bit. Finally figured out that attributing so many contradictory "benefits" to identical cigarettes was ridiculous. I need to relax or I need to focus sounds better than I need another fix. Facing the fact that I smoked because I was addicted to nicotine and I was addicted to nicotine because I smoked was important for me. Helped me recognize the futility of smoking.
    13 points
  14. I am 73 and began smoking right out of highschool. Never had a solid quit. It would be a week here or a few days quit and then re do the process over and over. When I decided to quit, this time for good, I had read and re read Alan Carr's Easy Way over and over until I finally got it. Smoking is doing nothing for me. It is killing me slowly. Being here these past few days has helped me stay the course. In a few days I will have a week into this forever quit. Being here has helped tremendously.
    13 points
  15. It was five years ago today that I snubbed out my last smoke. I remember it like it was yesterday, now that I really think about it (which I rarely do anymore). I was standing in my usual smoking spot on the side of the house. I looked at my last smoke and said "I'm done". At that exact moment, I made the commitment to never smoke again. I promised myself that no matter what -no matter how hard it was or how angry I got - I would never EVER take another puff of a cigarette. Now here I am and all the withdrawals, obsessing, stressing and general madness that went along with the first days, weeks and months of my quit are all just very faded memories. I rarely even think about cigarettes anymore and when I do, it's hard to believe I ever smoked at all. It's just such a foreign concept. My girlfriend honestly forgets that I ever smoked and if I happen to tell people I've met that I used to smoke, they can't imagine it. I never thought I would NOT be thought of as a smoker. It's a pretty amazing feeling. I smoked a pack a day for thirty years and was as addicted as anyone and if I can quit, anyone can. YOU can! If you're struggling, stick with it. If you feel weak, post an SOS here. Make the commitment to never smoke again and honor that commitment Every. Single Day. Your life depends on it! YOU CAN DO THIS!!!!
    13 points
  16. Thanks for the shout out people!! 5 years is quite a milestone for sure and I have never regretted having made the commitment to quit despite the difficulties in the early days. All the newbies need to know it's possible for all who put in the work to find their freedom from nicotine addiction. The difficulties and doubts fade away and are replaced by rewards that last a lifetime! As for me - the wife & I are livin' the good life on the beach in Mexico playin' in the sun
    13 points
  17. Growing up in So Cal ive always been athletic and enjoyed outdoor sports. All of them. Smoking interfered with my performance so it had to go. Successfully quit once for almost 10 years, then took a puff and was hooked again for 7 years before my final quit in Feb 2021. I own a contracting company that deals with fire protection and im sure I looked stoopid puffing on a grit I now own the fact im an addict, and I can never ever take even one puff and im good with that. Now that im smoke free im back to playing ice hockey and running triathlons at 55+ years old and in great shape & kicking butt This site is key to my quit-
    13 points
  18. Ok.... Listen up !!!! This is not a crime ...more of a Dam Shame.... What IS a Crime is you not coming back and trying again ... Never Give Up....Giving Up.....Smoking Kills....People die far too young Risking your Health ....That's A Crime .... We have plenty of seats ...just pick one ,let's try again ... You know deep down Quitting is the most sensible thing to do ...
    13 points
  19. Hey Guys ...yes ..you ....the Newbies ... Where are you ???.... Come and tell us ....were missing you around here .... Us Oldies ,sitting here twiddling our thumbs ...we want to help... Give us something to do .... And if anyone else wants to take a seat ..there is plenty ...just jump on ... You won't regret it .... Make the move ...Change your life .... See you all soon
    12 points
  20. Hello everyone. Hope all is safe and sound. Staying healthy, I hope. Today I am celebrating my 90th day off Cigarettes! I am doing just Great and feeling terrific! I want to mention that w/o my beautiful wife of almost 27 years and the people here, that I don't know where I would be. A very big Thanks!!! SAL and Anita
    12 points
  21. Welcome aboard the Quit Train Happy Passenger. Good call on giving up the smokes. Enjoy the ride.
    12 points
  22. Good for you Happy Passenger. You have the power and strength to quit. Keep telling yourself you no longer smoke and power through the cravings. The nicotine is gone after a couple of days and then you learn to redirect those thoughts. Stay close to the forum, educate yourself, play some games and get to know us. We would love to help you along your journey.
    12 points
  23. Hello HappyPassenger Welcome to the train. I stayed logged on the boards when I quit (even if I was not always reading something) it simply made me feel safer and saner to know I could reach out at any time. notsmokjo is correct there a lot of resources available here. Please do take advantage of that and the fun ones too (songs, games ect) Best wishes!
    12 points
  24. 9 years free today for me and quita wow
    12 points
  25. It's a New Month .... Who,s sitting on the Train ....stand up and be Counted Horney Toad is here of course ....
    12 points
  26. Still on the train! Day 21.
    12 points
  27. To all new quitters !! Dont let the holiday season give you a excuse to throw your life saving quit Down the toilet ... Your life may depend on it .... Please use the SOS thread ,if you feel your quit is in trouble ... Or PM either me or Jillar .... I'm sure we will not be too far away .... I will have my frying pan at the ready ....be warned .... Be careful of your alcohol in take ....I've seen many quits fail due to thinking they could handle the booze .... Merry Xmas Newbies ,not so New ,and Oldies ...
    12 points
  28. 99,599 in memory of my brother Jim and our Invisible Man...
    11 points
  29. My pregnant daughter, her husband, and their two children flew to Texas day before yesterday. They'd had enough of mask mania and living under lockdown here in Seattle. I'll miss them, especially their eight year old daughter, whom I often cared for when she was a toddler--overnights at grandma's house, trips to the park together, etc. (When the one-year old gets a bit older, he'll come, too.) When you've lived in a house for years, you probably know how things can collect. There was so much for them to do and pack up. About twenty bags of discards and some small furniture were left behind for me to take to a donation drop site. I made trips back and forth to drop the bags/furniture at my place--several hours of driving each day, plus load and unload. My back was aching. They had professional cleaners come in on their last day in the house and clean bathrooms and kitchen. They were to have come back the following day to finish, but couldn't--a schedule snafu. So I cleaned, starting at 6 am. The house needs to go on the market so they can sell it and buy a new one in Texas. Then I boxed the cookware they need asap in Texas, plus my son-in-law's electrician's tools (weighs 43 lb) so that he can start working right away, and took them to the UPS office for shipping. On the way into the UPS office, straining my back with the 43 lb tool set (it felt like 75 lb, but I'm 71, so guess I'm not as strong as I used to be), I passed a guy standing outside the minimart, 15 feet away, peacefully smoking and drinking a cup of coffee. A part of me yearned to just drop the tools on the spot and join him for a smoke. But after almost two years of being a nonsmoker and pledging NOPE, you know the end to that story. I continued into the UPS office, made all the arrangements for them to professionally box the cookware and tools, paid the nice people (it's a family-owned business), and went home. Smoker-guy was back inside the minimart, believing that he'd just had a relaxing break, not realizing he'd only fed an addicted nicotine monster that was soon going to yowl for more. It feels good to be a nonsmoker. NOPE
    11 points
  30. My name's Christian, and I've been quit for 20 years now (smoked from age 18 to age 33). Being a nonsmoker is a fundamental part of my identity, and I continue to benefit from the lessons that I learned from my quitting process. While I haven't had a craving or thought of smoking in about 18 years or so, I remain vigilant because I fear the addiction: the depth and power of my addiction (and the difficulty of those initial stages) were really unsettling and frightening to me. In addition, like many people, I have experienced the health effects of smoking: my brother died at 42 from lung cancer; my mother died at 70 from throat cancer; and I suffered a major heart attack and cardiac arrest at age 40 (my prior smoking obviously a major cause). I've devoted much of my adult life to education, and I'm an English professor at a community college. It's work that I love and that I'm privileged to do. Christian99
    11 points
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QuitTrain®, a quit smoking support community, was created by former smokers who have a deep desire to help people quit smoking and to help keep those quits intact.  This place should be a safe haven to escape the daily grind and focus on protecting our quits.  We don't believe that there is a "one size fits all" approach when it comes to quitting smoking.  Each of us has our own unique set of circumstances which contributes to how we go about quitting and more importantly, how we keep our quits.

 

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